No Bladder Hydration System

CEG017

FNG
Joined
Dec 8, 2023
Messages
17
Hey Guys,

Looking for some examples on full hydration systems that do not use a bladder. Would love to hear about what containers you use, filter system, etc as well as your process for transporting and filtering water in the field. I am thinking about going with this method for the durability that comes with it.

Thanks!
 

TheHammer

WKR
Joined
Aug 1, 2022
Messages
548
Location
juneau wi
This past archery elk season was the first year I did not run a water bladder. I went with the yeti yonder in 34*oz and had 2 body armor water bottles. My filter is a sawyer squeeze and I brought a mini as backup. The yonder fit perfectly in the k4 Nalgene holder and required very little effort to pull out and reinsert single handily. Was pretty happy with the results. All white tail seasons after I opted for the yonder in pouch and a spare bottle to be safe. Most of those day hunts were minimal 4mile treks, with no issues or complaints. Doubt I’ll be switching my setup anytime soon.
 
Joined
Mar 11, 2017
Messages
754
Is “durability” the reason you wish to ditch the bladder?

I use MSR Dromedry bags. They are incredibly durable. Mine have been strong enough to sit on (ymmv).

In addition to a bladder I always carry a Nalgene wide mouth bottle.
 
OP
C

CEG017

FNG
Joined
Dec 8, 2023
Messages
17
Is “durability” the reason you wish to ditch the bladder?

I use MSR Dromedry bags. They are incredibly durable. Mine have been strong enough to sit on (ymmv).

In addition to a bladder I always carry a Nalgene wide mouth bottle.
Yeah mainly durability, reliability, and cost. I'm really new to backpacking, but have heard some horror stories of bladders popping. I also just am not sure how much of an advantage it is to use a bladder over hard bottles besides how easy it is to get a drink. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong on this!
 

5MilesBack

"DADDY"
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
15,623
Location
Colorado Springs
What's wrong with a bladder? I've been using my Mil Spec 3L Camelbak since 2005. I don't even have to open it or take it out to refill it with my Katadyn filter. Just pop the mouth piece out and insert the pump fill tube attachment, and start pumping. Then use a MSR Dromedary bag as shown above for hauling extra water if needed.

Of course if you're wanting a setup for the late cold seasons where everything freezes, then it's hard to beat bottles. But then the filter wants to freeze too.
 

TFrank

WKR
Joined
Dec 9, 2020
Messages
316
Harside hydration is very cool. Switched over to it this year. Still rock squeeze filters went from sawyer to katadyn be free
 
Joined
Aug 10, 2015
Messages
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Yeah mainly durability, reliability, and cost. I'm really new to backpacking, but have heard some horror stories of bladders popping. I also just am not sure how much of an advantage it is to use a bladder over hard bottles besides how easy it is to get a drink. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong on this!
You would have to do something incredibly stupid to "pop" a modern water bladder.

Lately, I have preferred just taking a couple of nalgene bottles.
 

*zap*

WKR
Joined
Dec 20, 2018
Messages
7,122
Location
N/E Kansas
Yeah mainly durability, reliability, and cost. I'm really new to backpacking, but have heard some horror stories of bladders popping. I also just am not sure how much of an advantage it is to use a bladder over hard bottles besides how easy it is to get a drink. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong on this!
I will second the msr dromedary bags...and camelbak bladders are mil-spec....probably better than the 'lightweight' water bags.....I really do not know of a different way to carry a larger amount of water other than nalgenes...below freezing temps are also problem.
 

TaperPin

WKR
Joined
Jul 12, 2023
Messages
1,937
Yeah mainly durability, reliability, and cost. I'm really new to backpacking, but have heard some horror stories of bladders popping. I also just am not sure how much of an advantage it is to use a bladder over hard bottles besides how easy it is to get a drink. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong on this!
Hard sided bottles just take a huge amount of space when empty, and bladders don’t.

I have seen hoses come off and half the water drains out before it’s noticed and the hose is replaced, but catastrophic failure is quite rare.

If someone is careless, likes to jam a pack full with little regard to organizing, or is too cheap for a bladder appropriate for where they want to strap it or stuff it, then they should use a hard bottle like a nalgene. A lot of backpacking filters are designed around a nalgene bottle for a reason - for decades it’s been a solid reliable way to haul water.

Many of us use both. I like a bladder for what I have to carry around all day, but I always have an extra liter in a nalgene, that lives in a nylon pouch on the belt of the pack. For eating, cooking, and pumping water through a filter, the hard bottle is just easier to use. Those who only have a bladder have to do some interesting gymnastics just to eat and refill them - they either get good at unpacking and rerouting the bladder or they are married to it and have to take it everywhere just for a drink.
 

Stickbow

FNG
Joined
Sep 16, 2016
Messages
88
Location
SLC, UT
I'm interested in this topic as well, I've never "popped" a bladder but man the number of times that I've had water leak everywhere double digits. I do like have water accessable though, and having a waterbottle on my waist belt sounds very annoying. Also I like to sit on my pack while glassing, and that will squeeze out water.

Oh and on late season hunts if your bladder freezes its hard to melt. I like having a metal bottle like kleen kanteen style that I can throw right on my stove.
 

Matt5266

WKR
Joined
Sep 19, 2021
Messages
353
Location
SW Idaho
I usually do a bladder plus a nalgene for drink mixs. (Water gets old after a couple days).

I also will do a nalgene and Sawyer bags that I will fill when I cross water. I like to mark any water sources in the area I'll be and can usually plan and filter accordingly. Sometimes you have to drop elevation or hike a distance to get some. But its saves from having to pack 10 pounds of water too.
 

Matt5266

WKR
Joined
Sep 19, 2021
Messages
353
Location
SW Idaho
Also I pack aquamira tablets as a last resort. I mostly use my Sawyer squeeze but also carry the Katadyn Befree for clean free flowing mountain water because it's so much faster at filtering
 
OP
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CEG017

FNG
Joined
Dec 8, 2023
Messages
17
Hard sided bottles just take a huge amount of space when empty, and bladders don’t.

I have seen hoses come off and half the water drains out before it’s noticed and the hose is replaced, but catastrophic failure is quite rare.

If someone is careless, likes to jam a pack full with little regard to organizing, or is too cheap for a bladder appropriate for where they want to strap it or stuff it, then they should use a hard bottle like a nalgene. A lot of backpacking filters are designed around a nalgene bottle for a reason - for decades it’s been a solid reliable way to haul water.

Many of us use both. I like a bladder for what I have to carry around all day, but I always have an extra liter in a nalgene, that lives in a nylon pouch on the belt of the pack. For eating, cooking, and pumping water through a filter, the hard bottle is just easier to use. Those who only have a bladder have to do some interesting gymnastics just to eat and refill them - they either get good at unpacking and rerouting the bladder or they are married to it and have to take it everywhere just for a drink.
So how do you use your bladder and hard bottle system exactly? What I mean is do you keep clean water in the nalgene on your hip and then just use the bladder for dirty water or extra clean water? For example if you come across a place to get water, what are you doing? Again, pretty new to this so just trying to learn. Appreciate the help.
 

svivian

WKR
Joined
Mar 16, 2016
Messages
2,836
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Colorado
For long backpacking trips I like to use a gravity filter like the katadyn Base Camp 10L. If I know I'm camping somewhere with limited to no water access I can fill the gravity filter and pack it up to camp.

Then I use the Hardside hydration since the nipple at the top also fits the tube coming out of my water filter and can fill my water bottle as I need. Very simple method for me and I much prefer nalgene bottles.
 
Joined
Jul 20, 2014
Messages
955
Location
Kirtland, NM
I started using hardside hydration this last season as well. Can’t say enough good things about this system. I carry two large Nalgene bottles for most day hunts which is more than enough water. For backpacking I carry the same two bottles plus a Katadyn water filter and a gravity bag for camp.
 
Joined
Mar 11, 2017
Messages
754
i was the last of my buddies to go bladder.
What sold me was how quiet a bladder is vs. the sloshing in a hard bottle. Thin plastic bottles make a horribly loud crackle too.
 

TaperPin

WKR
Joined
Jul 12, 2023
Messages
1,937
So how do you use your bladder and hard bottle system exactly? What I mean is do you keep clean water in the nalgene on your hip and then just use the bladder for dirty water or extra clean water? For example if you come across a place to get water, what are you doing? Again, pretty new to this so just trying to learn. Appreciate the help.
I don’t put any unfiltered water in bottles or bladders.

Where and when to filter water depends on where you camp. Usually it’s not hard to camp next to water, but sometimes a dry camp means you have to make a special trip away from hunting to a water source, or you might hunt a certain drainage just to grab some water during the day.

As a general rule I don’t like packing a filter around all day, but I will have water purification tablets if I’m out of water and happen to be crossing a stream. The msr filters are an old design that is reliable and fairly easy to use - it simply screws onto a wide mouth Nalgene bottle, the hose goes in the water and you pump the handle.

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