CO Elk Gear List 2019

CampCook

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2017
Messages
21
Location
Oregon
I do not believe that the InReach and the OnX will work together. I got the InReach Mini last year and used that with my phone and ran OnX on my phone.
 

Jpugs

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Mar 21, 2017
Messages
253
Location
Pennsylvania
Inreach is a great investment if you can spare the funds, looks like you have quite a bit of clothes ( remember by the time it gets cold you'll most likely be in your tent tucked away in your sleeping bag) As far as rain gear, I would bring a lightweight jacket and leave the pants behind ( unless the forecast is calling for some good rain. IMO in Colorado all the times i've been out its usually just a 5-10 min rain/hail in the afternoon. By the time you dig around and get your rain gear on, storms over and your taking it back off....in "most" of my cases. Also I would lighten up your load and just leave the pistol behind...just my personal preference
 

HoytHntr4

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Mar 16, 2019
Messages
342
Location
Minnesota
Appreciate the input guys the InReach would be nice if I can just replace my cell phone all together with that on the trip. Can you use OnX with the InReach?
No you can’t, I would pick up an inReach mini, they weigh next to nothing. Then just run OnX on your phone with the downloadable offline maps. Having the InReach to get weather updates is a plus. Maybe look into bringing a charging pack or small solar charger as well to keep both charged. I think the battery life on the mini is supposed to be around 50 hours?
 
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Shipanik6

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jan 11, 2019
Messages
218
Location
Illinois
No you can’t, I would pick up an inReach mini, they weigh next to nothing. Then just run OnX on your phone with the downloadable offline maps. Having the InReach to get weather updates is a plus. Maybe look into bringing a charging pack or small solar charger as well to keep both charged. I think the battery life on the mini is supposed to be around 50 hours?
Thanks I was just watching YouTube reviews on them and saw they can’t use OnX or take a chip. I have a battery pack so I will just use my phone offline with predownloaded maps. Definitely looking more at the mini right now
 

dr.mooseknuckles

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 7, 2018
Messages
321
Location
South Carolina
The mini is clutch. I’d say to bring all of your above mentioned gear with you, if allows, and out what you really need in your pack once you get to the trailhead. That way if you really need it, you can always go get it. Hell, that’s basically how I killed my elk this past season. Just walking back to the trailhead


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LandYacht

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jan 25, 2014
Messages
773
Location
Frisco
Total clothes I bring, comprised of both on my body and in my pack, work out to a merino base layer for both top and bottom, 2 pairs of merino boxers, 2 pairs of merino socks, one pair of pants, one hooded merino top, a puffy jacket/vest, a rain jacket, rain pants, gloves, gaiters, ball cap, merino beanie, and a web belt.

Actual weight, according to my scale, is 106 ounces. To me it doesn’t matter if it’s in my pack, or on my body, because I’m still having to carry it.

My base layers double as my sleeping bag liner and add more warmth than a bag liner would.

My rain pants and rain jacket double as a wind block when I’m sitting and glassing.

Finding double duty for items your are carrying will help you cut weight from your overall burden.




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sargent

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Mar 7, 2017
Messages
689
Location
Pennsylvania
I hunted CO last year opening week of archery (8/25-8/31). For clothes, I'd say one pair of extra socks, boots, gaiters, and wranglers and undies on bottom, and base layer, fleece, puffy on top with the lightest rain coat you can find. I used a cheap wal-mart pvc coat. With a ball cap, beanie and a light pair of gloves, you should be good to go. You don't need the gun. You could also save 12 ounces by replacing the nalgenes with 1 liter soda or water bottles https://sectionhiker.com/go-light-ditch-your-nalgene-bottles/. Good luck. Be safe. HAVE FUN!
 
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Shipanik6

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jan 11, 2019
Messages
218
Location
Illinois
I hunted CO last year opening week of archery (8/25-8/31). For clothes, I'd say one pair of extra socks, boots, gaiters, and wranglers and undies on bottom, and base layer, fleece, puffy on top with the lightest rain coat you can find. I used a cheap wal-mart pvc coat. With a ball cap, beanie and a light pair of gloves, you should be good to go. You don't need the gun. You could also save 12 ounces by replacing the nalgenes with 1 liter soda or water bottles https://sectionhiker.com/go-light-ditch-your-nalgene-bottles/. Good luck. Be safe. HAVE FUN!
I carry an empty 1 liter Smart Water bottle as my dirty water bottle that I can screw my Sawyer water filter onto and since I will have a water bladder I will probably ditch the Nalgene.
 
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Shipanik6

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jan 11, 2019
Messages
218
Location
Illinois
Have you weighed your pack with all this gear yet?

That alone will quickly help decide what you need/ dont need
I haven't weighed it yet but I've done some hiking/scouting trips with everything on my list except food and a full water bladder and I would say I'm around 30-35 pounds.
 

fngTony

Super Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 18, 2016
Messages
3,536
Location
Colorado
I haven't weighed it yet but I've done some hiking/scouting trips with everything on my list except food and a full water bladder and I would say I'm around 30-35 pounds.

You might be surprised actually weighing it. I would count all clothing except minimal layers as pack weight since you won’t need to wear much hiking in. That could be a few pounds itself.
 

BCSojourner

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 24, 2018
Messages
163
Location
Kremmling, CO
Using a Paria 0 degree down sleeping bag with an uninsulated Klymit V sleeping pad. The blanket is basically just a liner that I use underneath my pad so its very small and light. Right now its looking like I will be leaving the puffy in the truck from what everyone's been telling me.

Don't leave any rain gear or gaiters behind - this could be a very wet year, certainly unlike last year which was very dry in September. In 2013 and 2015 it rained buckets in the backcountry in CO and there were a lot of wet miserable hunters. Yes, monsoons can last only 5-10 minutes but I have seen it rain off and on for hours over a few days as well and if you can't stay dry you will be miserable. Because it was so dry last year, there will likely be a lot of unprepared and wet miserable hunters this year. Use your rain gear over other layers as already suggested. I have never used or needed down pants in over 25 years of hunting the CO backcountry in archery season. The InReach Mini is an invaluable piece of equipment for communicating real time with family - can set it up to send them a map of your location as well as your tracks when you send a message - works great when synched with your phone. Aqua Mira drops are an easy way to purify water when in camp and the Sawyer squeeze filter and dirty water bag (Platypus Big Zip) in your pack is a quick way to fill a water bottle when you come to a good source. If you are going to be distant from water sources be sure to also have a full 2L bladder bag setup. You don't need to carry a cannon in CO - there are some excellent high-tech penetrating loads for smaller calibers like a 9mm that you can actually hit something with and do lots of damage. Encountering a lot more bears these days in CO, so if carrying makes you feel safer then by all means do it. Bear spray is ok if the wind is cooperating but it usually isn't, plus you have to wait until an animal gets pretty close to use it when a couple of warning shots might do the trick. Would advise that you include a compass and laminated maps - hybrid topo of the area you will be hunting and make sure they are in your pack. Electronics can and do go belly-up or dead. Carry lithium batteries in everything (they are lighter) and as backups (vacuum seal your backups so they stay together and are easier to find in your pack). Don't forget a reliable battery pack for charging electronics.
 

Usi05

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jan 7, 2019
Messages
1,284
Location
Michigan
Total clothes I bring, comprised of both on my body and in my pack, work out to a merino base layer for both top and bottom, 2 pairs of merino boxers, 2 pairs of merino socks, one pair of pants, one hooded merino top, a puffy jacket/vest, a rain jacket, rain pants, gloves, gaiters, ball cap, merino beanie, and a web belt.

Actual weight, according to my scale, is 106 ounces. To me it doesn’t matter if it’s in my pack, or on my body, because I’m still having to carry it.

My base layers double as my sleeping bag liner and add more warmth than a bag liner would.

My rain pants and rain jacket double as a wind block when I’m sitting and glassing.

Finding double duty for items your are carrying will help you cut weight from your overall burden.




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Very helpful post for newbie like me. Thanks


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xziang

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Oct 8, 2014
Messages
744
Location
Nebraska
my .02 Keep rain gear. I use my rain gear when I might be chilled. Makes a great wind breaker and keep the warmth in when I decide to sit on a trail for a bit. Guide pants were to HOT for me. I like the attack pants and zip off bottoms. Love my gaiters and use those all the time.

I run an inreach and love it. I have it paired to my cell phone for satellite imagery. (for the area I hunt) I don't need onX for the area I hunt I don't need to worry about the borders or private ground. Don't give up your cell phone that is your camera for cool pictures.
 

Jblack86

Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2018
Messages
62
Location
Tulsa oklahoma
Last September
hunted 6 days
rain/sleeted 3 days
15-25 degrees at night
called a mountain lion to 10 feet on opening day
saw bear scat every 25 yards but did see a bear, but had them in camp at night
My point is..... Rain gear, extra warm sleep system, Garmin inreach, and a gun will always go with me to the back country. I will happily shed an extra few pounds from my person or my pack to ensure I have them.
 

Broadhead

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2019
Messages
45
Location
Denver, CO
I second (or tenth) the use of gaiters, a comfortable bino harness and bringing less clothes. I have over-packed clothes the last two years and have regretted it each time. This year I will be wearing:

Top - FL Wick Short Sleeve Crew, FL Kiln Hoody and packing the FL Uncompahgre for extended sits.
Bottom - FL Corrugate Guides or the new FL Sawbuck Brush pant. I also take a baselayer for cold mornings (worth the weight IMO). I have heard good things about the Wrangler Outdoor pants though.
Two pairs of socks and two pairs of underwear.

Regarding suture kit, bring it and pray you don't need it. Some things are just worth the weight for peace of mind.
 

btplass

Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2017
Messages
93
I rented an inreach from oerentals. Very pleased with my experience. They are very helpful. Great customer service. Good pricing

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vanniek71

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 23, 2018
Messages
35
Location
WI
I carry my CCW 9mm just in case. Figure I can try to scare something off - but if a bear or mountain lion gets a hold of me and its going bad...I'll have 1 so it doesn't hurt as bad.

On a more positive note, opening weekend usually isn't that bad temperature wise. Last year I was hunting in a T shirt and was still too hot, but I would say stash a puffy just in case and either carry a sil tarp or rain gear, the mountains love to switch it up on you with little to no notice. Good thing is its generally gone fast too.
 

Whip

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Nov 28, 2015
Messages
474
Your bag is plenty warm but personally I'd want an insulated pad. It doesn't matter what the rating on your bag is if there is no insulation below it you are going to sleep a lot colder. Not sure what elevation you will be at but it can get pretty cool at night in the mountains even in early Sept.
I would agree that the puffy pants are overkill and probably the zip off bottoms as well.
In Reach is excellent for safety but much prefer my phone w/map ap for navigation.
 

Brendan

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Aug 27, 2013
Messages
3,822
Location
Massachusetts
Leave the corrugate jacket. Bring rain shell.

Too many insulating layers up top - you can get away with Base layers, puffy, rain jacket. Maybe one extra merino like hoody if your puffy is light.

Pants - bring rain pants, leave puffy pants, I do like the Kuiu zip off merino bottoms.

Navigation - Inreach and a phone with Gaia or OnX

Maybe 1 extra pair socks and boxers. Maybe.

Ditch the crocs.

Make sure you know how to use flint or leave it. You already have lighter, matches, fire starter. Bring an extra small Bic.

I hate the sawyer - but that's personal. Don't let it clog or freeze.

Leave extra blanket, coffee cup, book
 
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