Broadheads Hitting to the Right. New Arrows? Arrow Build Help / Advice

ResearchinStuff

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jan 26, 2017
Messages
1,002
Location
PA
I use exodus heads, so leverage is minimal on impact. 3 years now with the same 2 dozen and I haven't had one bend yet. Not saying they can't or won't, but they haven't.
 

Yobrevol

Junior Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2022
Messages
34
As a right-handed shooter the pre lean in your cam should be the other direction because of the cable guard. Leaning the cam to the right will make the broadheads shoot further right though. As you have already stated the arrow spine is the likely issue. If moving your rest does not affect broadhead impact it can be arrow spine, nock pinch, nock fit, fletching contact, or the shooters form.
 

Marble

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
2,597
This would certainly be the cheapest option. If I cut to 28.5 and drop DW to 67. They should tune.

View attachment 433661
Before you drop draw weight, shoot them at 28.5 and also look at how they sit on the rest. Depending on where your rest is, you may be able to go shorter.

Additionally, do one thing at a time. Don't do a bunch of shit and then make it worse. Cut the arrows, test. Change draw weight, and test.

If you change one thing, you change everything.

If you still have a right tear, spray some foot powder on the arrow vanes, about the last 8" and shoot it. Just to rule out contact.

Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk
 

Marble

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
2,597
My suggestion would be to get some 300 spine shafts.

Going to want them shorter, but if your draw length is 29.5, then there's no reason to have them at 31. 29.5 is going to be roughly the back (front in actuality) of the riser. I'm currently shooting 26.5" on a 28.9" draw.


Don't get lost in FOC. You want to have 10% at minimum, anything past 15% doesn't seem to help a bit.

For elk hunting the way I hunt, I'd want more speed than the 255. So personally I'd give up some weight to get to around 270 fps at the minimum. I have plenty of confidence in what I need for adequate penetration, I think with your specs you would be fine from 425-475gr assuming you get the tuning figured out and have good arrow flight.
To the OP, listen to the advice above.

I think shooting the 350s is marginal regardless. Depending on your cam it may work OK but in the future you may need to shoot 300 spine.

It seems with 70 pound draw weights and draw lengths around 29, the right arrow hovers around the 300 to 340 range.

Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk
 

Billy Goat

🐐 Memester
Joined
May 6, 2018
Messages
7,208
Location
Shenandoah Valley
To the OP, listen to the advice above.

I think shooting the 350s is marginal regardless. Depending on your cam it may work OK but in the future you may need to shoot 300 spine.

It seems with 70 pound draw weights and draw lengths around 29, the right arrow hovers around the 300 to 340 range.

Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk

I had forgotten the alphamax is only a 316 ibo bow.

That's why I went back and said to cut down. I had good arrow flight with 350 maximas out of a 72# Hoyt Katera.

But any newer bow with a 335+ ibo, yeah, 300 with 70# and 29+.

But definitely change one thing at a time.
 

homebru.trout

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Sep 24, 2016
Messages
1,166
Location
Conifer, CO
As a right-handed shooter the pre lean in your cam should be the other direction because of the cable guard. Leaning the cam to the right will make the broadheads shoot further right though. As you have already stated the arrow spine is the likely issue. If moving your rest does not affect broadhead impact it can be arrow spine, nock pinch, nock fit, fletching contact, or the shooters form.
+1 to this. You have negative cam lean. Assuming the tech knew what they were doing before turning on the wallet vacuum (and that's a biiiig if in my experience), it is likely the bow tunes this way due to some other issue and arrow spine is one possible culprit. No matter what you do about arrows, you need to start your tune by correcting the top cam lean. Some shops will have a supply of dead soldiers...either shop arrows or cut shafts that folks never picked up. Suggest just buying a couple stiffer arrows and testing before you throw another $200 at the problem.

If this were my bow I would ensure the rest was at factory spec for center shot, twist yolks to get slight cam lean the other direction, and try your current arrows plus a couple stiffer options. Based on what that told me, I'd tune to one of those shafts and buy maybe 3-6 to shoot for a week or two before going whole hog.
 
Last edited:

5MilesBack

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
14,263
Location
Colorado Springs
You had new strings put on, so I'd verify all the bow specs first and make sure they're "on" or make adjustments to get there.

Then I'd start by cutting 3+ inches off those arrows. That's going to stiffen them up quite a bit. Then I'd make sure the centershot is where it's supposed to be. Then set the top cam pre-lean to where it needs to be using an arrow against the cam to check where the point is in relation to your nocking point. Check your nocking point position and rest height in relation to a level arrow. Also make sure your rest height is set so your vanes will clear everything from the start.

Then I'd check for vane contact before doing anything else. Also spin check your arrows to make sure there's no wobble and everything is spinning true. Then verifying no contact or fixing the contact, then I'd start with BH's again.

If you have the same situation, then turn the bow down to 60lbs and see what that does.....if anything. If that brings your BH's and FP's together, then try some 300's and crank the bow back to 70+ and try again. Your shop should have some 300's you can try before running out and buying them.......just to see if that will work.

I'd also fix the vertical difference first by adjusting your control cable. Lots of times, fixing the vertical difference will change what BH's are doing in relation to FP's horizontally as well. After fixing the vertical, then start playing with the horizontal.
 

Clarson757

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 27, 2022
Messages
44
Probably need 300 spine.

I’ve got very similar bow stats and here’s my setup that shoots amazing. I don’t shoot out to 100 or ever plan to but out to 80 these are flying perfect.

VAP SS 300
  • 563 grains taw
  • 22.3% foc
  • 55gn titanium insert
  • 200gn tuffhead broadhead or cutthroat
  • Shaft to shaft 27 9/16” - 9.9 GPI
  • Four fletch aae hybrid
  • Luminock
 

stanginthe11s

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jul 6, 2022
Messages
249
first, that cam lean is wrong. a basic start point is both cams meeting at the nock point then tune from there. cam lean is something you don't want but is usually needed. being that far over puts stress on the serving and could cause a derail. I'm gonna guess he has the bottom cam wrong too. besides the tuning those arrows are too long as mentioned. I have the same arrows and in stock form at 29" with a 125 head they come in at around 480 gn. which is fine for elk, put a lighted nock and you'll be around 500gn. don't get hung up on all the #'s, its far more important to have you gear set up correctly by a reputable tuner. when looking for a shop if someone tells you the design of the bow is wrong, walk away.
 

Jellymon1

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 26, 2020
Messages
111
Location
Wetside Washington
Not sure why this is being said, but you do not want your upper cam to lean the other direction. Yours is leaning the right direction, just too much. When you draw the bow the cables put a ton of pressure on the right side of the cams, which rotates the upper cam clockwise slightly as you draw. If the cams start out leaning the other direction it will end up leaning even further that direction when you reach full draw. The goal is to have the upper cam relatively straight at full draw, while making small adjustments to the yokes to get proper arrow flight.
 

ResearchinStuff

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jan 26, 2017
Messages
1,002
Location
PA
Not sure why this is being said, but you do not want your upper cam to lean the other direction. Yours is leaning the right direction, just too much. When you draw the bow the cables put a ton of pressure on the right side of the cams, which rotates the upper cam clockwise slightly as you draw. If the cams start out leaning the other direction it will end up leaning even further that direction when you reach full draw. The goal is to have the upper cam relatively straight at full draw, while making small adjustments to the yokes to get proper arrow flight.
Yes, I a just double-checking the pictures and saw the same thing. The cam is leaning the right direction, just 2-3x as far off vertical as it should be. Normally tip of the field point touching the string at the nock point is about right.
 

stanginthe11s

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jul 6, 2022
Messages
249
get the bow set correctly first then cut your arrows to at least 29.5" . where are you located, I'm sure someone here can help with either fixing the bow or finding a reputable shop. seeing posts like this make me mad, strings were changed so the tech could do something he wanted to do? what makes people think they know more than hoyt? who knows if the strings are even correct.
I understand the fear of the broadhead, I have a friend who likes to stick his fingers up and I keep telling him he's gonna learn the hard way but as long as you hold the bow correctly you'll never have a problem.
 

Billy Goat

🐐 Memester
Joined
May 6, 2018
Messages
7,208
Location
Shenandoah Valley
get the bow set correctly first then cut your arrows to at least 29.5" . where are you located, I'm sure someone here can help with either fixing the bow or finding a reputable shop. seeing posts like this make me mad, strings were changed so the tech could do something he wanted to do? what makes people think they know more than hoyt? who knows if the strings are even correct.
I understand the fear of the broadhead, I have a friend who likes to stick his fingers up and I keep telling him he's gonna learn the hard way but as long as you hold the bow correctly you'll never have a problem.

Some of those bows had floating yokes.

Has fixed yokes now, I suspect it had a floating yoke cable on it.
 

stanginthe11s

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jul 6, 2022
Messages
249
true, I hadn't thought of that and its possible, but the techs reason behind the string change was misguided and ended with a cam way off. now 330$ later the customer still has the same problem but now has to fix what the shop did, the real kicker is the bow was probably perfect but his arrows are too long.
 

homebru.trout

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Sep 24, 2016
Messages
1,166
Location
Conifer, CO
Not sure why this is being said, but you do not want your upper cam to lean the other direction. Yours is leaning the right direction, just too much. When you draw the bow the cables put a ton of pressure on the right side of the cams, which rotates the upper cam clockwise slightly as you draw. If the cams start out leaning the other direction it will end up leaning even further that direction when you reach full draw. The goal is to have the upper cam relatively straight at full draw, while making small adjustments to the yokes to get proper arrow flight.
Yup. I stand corrected. Looked again at the photos and don't know what it was I was seeing the first time. 🙄 Direction is correct...amount is extreme. Sorry to add to the confusion.
 

SDHNTR

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Aug 30, 2012
Messages
4,121
You have a lot going on here. But you can’t even begin to tune until you have proper arrow spine. At 70#, you need a .300 spined arrow if they are any longer than 28”, and if you have anything heavier up front than a 100 gr broadhead. It’s hard to be overspined when shooting a release, but it’s easy to be underspined. Err on the stiff side always.

Then once you have the right arrows, start tuning. Make sure it’s YOU shooting through the paper as everyone shoots differently. Make sure the string has a good 150+ shots on it and is settled in. Grip torque can be a huge problem and will definitely throw broadhead flight off regardless of how well your bow is tuned. Learn to shoot with a low wrist and relaxed grip if you aren’t already. Some bows do need cam lean. Trust your tech if he’s good. If not, find a new one.
After all that, shoot for something like below:

425 gr+ Total arrow weight. 450 is better. 500+ is not necessary.

260ish+ fps, but do not chase speed. Quiet is far more deadly than fast!

Sharp fixed head.

Put it in the right place with a well tuned bow and proper arrow and nothing else matters.
 
Top