Bighorn Sheep Tag Process

Mojave

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If aoudad aren’t dealt with like varmints in Texas soon, it’s going to be a big problem for sheep. It already is.
They are cool animals though.
They cover 2/3rds of New Mexico.

They also have a way bigger range than bighorns do in the habitat they use.
 
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If aoudad aren’t dealt with like varmints in Texas soon, it’s going to be a big problem for sheep. It already is.
They are cool animals though.
Texas already allows them to be hunted year round. Problem is the private land. There has to be an incentive for the landowner to get rid of them. As of now there is none and they can sell aoudad hunts for $5-7k


I do wonder what their effect is on the native Desert Bighorn Sheep in the area. It’s too bad that bighorns in general are so susceptible to disease.

The bright spot though for Bighorns are the growing populations in Mexico. Through their game farms and releasing programs thousands more sheep are on the mountains.

There is a direct incentive for ranchers there to raise bighorns when they can sell hunts for $65-100k. I don’t know if Texas will get to the point of allow private herds, and then giving landowner tags to property owners to sell.

I guess it’s a bit easier in Mexico since the ranches in general are much bigger, and the system in place for game management is already through the ranches
 
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CBar

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I think I know the answer already, but just to set the record straight - are you a resident of a state that offers bighorn sheep opportunities?
 
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Book a tougher aoudad hunt in West Texas for the experience. Very similar to hunting desert bighorn sheep and no draws, no waiting, less capital expenditure, cheaper tags, and possibly less stress and ego from fellow hunters and participants.

I thought spotting the Barbary sheep in Texas was much more difficult than spotting the desert bighorn sheep in Arizona at long-range. No white rump on the aoudads and they blend into the terrain incredibly well.

At a minimum, use your aoudad hunt as training for your future bighorn hunts. It’s all good. Happy hunting, TheGrayRider a/k/a Tom.
 

cbeard64

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They may be expensive varmints but they are non-native varmints nonetheless. For 50 years nobody in TX thought much about them other than the ranchers who wanted them gone. No doubt the recent marketing/hype as the “5th sheep” (never mind that they are not sheep) has elevated their status - which can be either good or bad depending on where you sit.
 
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Texas already allows them to be hunted year round. Problem is the private land. There has to be an incentive for the landowner to get rid of them. As of now there is none and they can sell aoudad hunts for $5-7k


I do wonder what their effect is on the native Desert Bighorn Sheep in the area. It’s too bad that bighorns in general are so susceptible to disease.

The bright spot though for Bighorns are the growing populations in Mexico. Through their game farms and releasing programs thousands more sheep are on the mountains.

There is a direct incentive for ranchers there to raise bighorns when they can sell hunts for $65-100k. I don’t know if Texas will get to the point of allow private herds, and then giving landowner tags to property owners to sell.

I guess it’s a bit easier in Mexico since the ranches in general are much bigger, and the system in place for game management is already through the ranches
They out compete bighorns and mule deer in their native habitat and ranges while also passing on diseases they are not susceptible to.

Texas landowners get landowner sheep permits that they are free to use at their own discretion, but you won't ever hear about them because there is a certain outfitter who basically has a monopoly on all of them.

Many of the ranches in Tx that they inhabit are massive in size similar to MX.

The biggest issue is the outfitters/hunt brokers have turned aoudad into a cash cow and no landowner or outfitter is going to cutoff they're supply of easy mailbox money. Personally, I'd love to have the ability to own a ranch in the trans pecos and turn it into a bighorn and mule deer mecca but thats probably not in the cards.

It also doesn't help that WSF recognized them for getting out of the <1 club, promoting the conservation and growth of aoudad herds all while knowing they are detrimental to bighorns and mulies. Okay, off my soap box.
 
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WSF recognized them for getting out of the <1 club, promoting the conservation and growth of aoudad herds all while knowing they are detrimental to bighorns and mulies.
What do you mean by this? Are you saying if someone shoots an Audad that they are ineligible for the <1 dall hunt drawing?
 
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What do you mean by this? Are you saying if someone shoots an Audad that they are ineligible for the <1 dall hunt drawing?
Correct. Up until this year that was the case. They changed the rules just this year after it stood since the creation of their club.
 
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Texas already allows them to be hunted year round. Problem is the private land. There has to be an incentive for the landowner to get rid of them. As of now there is none and they can sell aoudad hunts for $5-7k


I do wonder what their effect is on the native Desert Bighorn Sheep in the area. It’s too bad that bighorns in general are so susceptible to disease.

The bright spot though for Bighorns are the growing populations in Mexico. Through their game farms and releasing programs thousands more sheep are on the mountains.

There is a direct incentive for ranchers there to raise bighorns when they can sell hunts for $65-100k. I don’t know if Texas will get to the point of allow private herds, and then giving landowner tags to property owners to sell.

I guess it’s a bit easier in Mexico since the ranches in general are much bigger, and the system in place for game management is already through the ranches
There about 8-10 Desert BH Land owner tags in Texas a year.

Problem with mexico is you have to be aware of the turn out rams with thin shaved hooves.

OP for a BH Id look at Land Owner tags in CO and NM and then Desert look at TX first then NM, then MX
 

aoudad

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you can get a UT raffle desert tag under 100k........ you don't have to spend 100k+ on a TX tag etc......
 
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They out compete bighorns and mule deer in their native habitat and ranges while also passing on diseases they are not susceptible to.

Texas landowners get landowner sheep permits that they are free to use at their own discretion, but you won't ever hear about them because there is a certain outfitter who basically has a monopoly on all of them.
Who is that outfitter? And do you know the going rate?
 

Mojave

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In the time it took you to ask the question, google found me 5 answers for Texas.


https://tedturnerreserves.com/armendaris/conservation-and-wildlife-at-armendaris/ These are 70-90,000
 
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There about 8-10 Desert BH Land owner tags in Texas a year.

Problem with mexico is you have to be aware of the turn out rams with thin shaved hooves.
For us poor guys that had to draw wild sheep tags, can you enlighten us on what "Thin shaved hooves" means?
 
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allegedly… released and hooves shaved so they dont go far, same thing on Deer.

Seriously? I hope that isn't the case, but I wouldn't put it past the hunting community.

Reminds me of a story back in the 90's on a plane for work to Africa. The guy sitting next to me provided "lion" hunts and was telling me they would purchase old worn out lions, drop the off in an area, and drive European and American hunters around for hours, days, to stretch the hunt out only to come around the corner and see ole Leo sitting there on his last legs. We all know what happened next.
 
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In the time it took you to ask the question, google found me 5 answers for Texas.


https://tedturnerreserves.com/armendaris/conservation-and-wildlife-at-armendaris/ These are 70-90,000
That's about the same price as the outfits in Mexico that consistently produce 170-180 rams charge. Would be alot simpler to just go to TX than go south of the border. Or you could book in Sonora for $55-65K for 150-160 rams. Guess it depends on what class of ram somebody is looking for, and whether or not they want to deal with the international (gun, getting trophy back, etc) stuff

Imagine they must have a waiting list for these TX hunts whereas in *Mexico* they seem to have openings all the time......
 
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Seriously? I hope that isn't the case, but I wouldn't put it past the hunting community.

Reminds me of a story back in the 90's on a plane for work to Africa. The guy sitting next to me provided "lion" hunts and was telling me they would purchase old worn out lions, drop the off in an area, and drive European and American hunters around for hours, days, to stretch the hunt out only to come around the corner and see ole Leo sitting there on his last legs. We all know what happened next.

It’s Mexico. Think about the lack of oversight. Double edge sword, more rams equal lower costs, but questionable free chase

On lions its pretty easy to spot the turn out lions. Wild lion or lions that have been turned out for a long time will have short manes. Big long thick manes…. didnt come from running through the brush. Ethics vs Species survival are two very different conversations where locals arent found of high apex predation to what amounts to life savings in live stock
 
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Mojave

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That's about the same price as the outfits in Mexico that consistently produce 170-180 rams charge. Would be alot simpler to just go to TX than go south of the border. Or you could book in Sonora for $55-65K for 150-160 rams. Guess it depends on what class of ram somebody is looking for, and whether or not they want to deal with the international (gun, getting trophy back, etc) stuff

Imagine they must have a waiting list for these TX hunts whereas in NM they seem to have openings all the time......
There are only 2 or 3 NM tags a year from the Amandaris.

In Mexico there are hundreds of rams available a year.
 
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