Running Again

TSAMP

WKR
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Jul 16, 2019
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Glad I found this thread. I think id been coming to this same conclusion myself over the last year or two. It seems like since I hit 30 the wheels have been falling off. I think what's truly happening is life and a desk job. Being active helps but there's alot of muscles you aren't working simply walking your dog and hunting. Lame sedimentary injuries from your desk height, sitting, and using a mouse all day chips away at your confidence. You start to feel fragile. When in your 20s you were drinking a busch light at 7am BEFORE the marathon without a second thought.

Thanks for the reminder OP.
 
Joined
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I’m appreciating this thread as well OP. I’ve ran 6 times in the past two weeks for the first time since I ruptured disks in my back 2.5 years ago. Definitely not where I used to be but I’m doing something and moving forward every day.


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When I got out of the Army at 32, I said I would never run again. I hated running any distance.

Early 2022, at 37 yrs old. I started running again. I wasn’t really out of shape. I hike a lot and I’m very active. But I decided that I was going to run a marathon. Mid life crisis I guess. I trained hard for several months and ran my first marathon in Oct 2022.

I ran another marathon March of this year. Doing a 30k trail race in a couple weeks. Also doing an Olympic Triathlon in August and IM 70.3 in October.

I’m 38, in the best shape of my life. I feel great. It’s awesome to see your progression.

The first time I ran 5k it took me 30:26. I ran one the other day in 22:30. My first 10k to 1hr 4 min. Now I can do one in sub 50 minutes. Half marathons were 2.5 hr ordeals. Now I’m 1hr 50 min.
 
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I started running after a friend moved into my neighborhood and talked me into it. That was in 2009 and I was 37. Up until that point I had never run more than a mile and a half that I can remember.

I worked up to 5k, then 10k, then ultimately 1/2 marathons. That is still the furthest distance I have run, but I enjoy training and running all year long.

It definitely helps keep my cardio level up and keeps me motivated to stay in elk hunting shape.

I’m a flat lander in Texas although there are some hills where I live. That always makes the transition to altitude harder, although I do think training in the heat and humidity in the summers makes up for the grit required to conquer the mountains.

I’m 51 now and in the best shape of my life as I’m running, rucking, doing step-ups, and weights ever since shoulder surgery a couple of years ago.

Time for a marathon I suppose.


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mtbraun

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Jul 6, 2023
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It’s good to start slow, our bodies aren’t really made to run. Total your weekly mileage and don’t increase by more than 10%/week. It takes time to strengthen muscles, ligaments, etc.
We are absolutely made to run. Think persistence hunting. We can shed heat better than any other mammal. We can cover more distance than almost any other mammal over a long period of time.
 
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We are absolutely made to run. Think persistence hunting. We can shed heat better than any other mammal. We can cover more distance than almost any other mammal over a long period of time.

The human body is great at 2 things. Running distances and carrying things distances.


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I'm jumping back in. Ready for Fall weather to get here.

That’s the worst part for me. 5:30 am in the summers here and the temps still over 80 with humidity on top of that.

I love running when its 40-50 degrees.


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TxxAgg

WKR
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Dec 27, 2019
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I hear you. I ran at 9:30pm last night. It was still upper 80's but only 10% humidity.

I'm coming off a knee surgery so as long as it doesn't hurt too bad I'll take anything I can get.
 

Durran87

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P Carter

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We may not be as good at persistence hunting as some theories posit:
I love reading these articles. They tried to do that with some pronghorn when I was living in Santa Fe; I think they made a short movie about it. Would be interesting to see this done with a larger plains animal (elk, perhaps, when they lived primarily on the plains) and a group of 5-10 guys who are equally fit and determined so they could trade off in front.
 

Yoder

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Jan 12, 2021
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We may not be as good at persistence hunting as some theories posit:
What I got out of the article was the guy wasn't good enough at tracking to stay on them long enough to run them down. I don't understand how they can say this wasn't possible when they openly admit they lost the group of animals. I read a book where a guy actually hunted this way with a tribe in Africa and killed some kind of plains animal. I can't remember what they were hunting.
 

mtwarden

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Yeah a one time shot certainly doesn't blow the theory in my opinion; it's still being done in Africa :)
 

luvsdux

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Aug 12, 2023
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Born to run by Chris McDougall and science of running by Chris Napier are great books. Born to run is the reverse to many people's opinions about humans not being made to run. Whatever your own opinions may be, it is a great read.
Born to run is an interesting book and I agree with the premise but in order to run with minimal support you really would need to avoid wearing shoes for most of your life to avoid injury to your ligaments and tendons. We are so conditioned to wearing shoes that breaking from the pattern is nearly impossible.
 

mtbraun

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Jul 6, 2023
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Born to run is an interesting book and I agree with the premise but in order to run with minimal support you really would need to avoid wearing shoes for most of your life to avoid injury to your ligaments and tendons. We are so conditioned to wearing shoes that breaking from the pattern is nearly impossible.
I love that book, but one of the problems I have with it is the minimalist running shoe craze it sort of set off. I have no problem with minimalist running, but I think too many people jumped right in and got hurt in the process. Plus, there's so much more to this book than minimalist running. It's just too bad that's what people associate it with.
 
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