Optimal bow performance

ofl0926

WKR
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May 23, 2015
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miami, fl
Hey what’s up everyone
So I’ve been some training for the up coming bow season. Working with a friend of mine we got into talking about draw weight and holding steady for a shot.
Currently I’m shooting an elite omnia 50-60lb at 27in draw set at 53lbs to work through my shot sequence. It’s been working. Now as I progress I will till I get to 60lbs but focusing on form first. I also have an elite era that is 60-70lbs.
my questions are as follow

Is it better to run a bow at the max poundage?
Do you think it will be better to turn down the Era to the draw weight I need?
Since I have such a short draw length, should I try and find a different bow that could provide more speed which equates to more KE?
Will my draw length increase when I turn the poundage up?

Thanks everyone


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I’m sure some more knowledgeable than me will chime in, but here’s my .02 worth.
Yes, bows are typically the most efficient at the top end of their poundage range. From everything I’ve read about the omnia, it’s a pretty speedy bow even at shorter draw lengths. Obviously running at only 60 lbs you aren’t going to be shooting laser beams (unless you shoot a really light arrow). I think you are wise to work up to 60 with the omnia, keep your form in check, and run that this season. Many animals have died from much less efficient bows with much less draw weight.
Also your draw length will not increase. Your bow will require adjustments in the tune when you are adjusting draw weight though.
 
Joined
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Being able to hold steady and aim accurately is of utmost importance. Don't sacrifice either of those chasing more draw weight/speed/KE. Both of your bows are plenty adequate to kill whatever you want to hunt. That said...

Is it better to run a bow at the max poundage?
I've often heard it said that a bow is more efficient toward the top end of its draw weight range, but I've never seen anyone present actual data to prove this. I would have no qualms about shooting a bow anywhere within its draw weight range.

Do you think it will be better to turn down the Era to the draw weight I need?
Adjust both your bows to the same draw weight and shoot them side-by-side over several shooting sessions. Keep track of group sizes and stick with whichever one groups better.

Since I have such a short draw length, should I try and find a different bow that could provide more speed which equates to more KE?
No, your current bows have plenty of speed/KE. The Omnia is a fairly aggressive bow anyway (347 fps IBO). Faster models are going to have even more aggressive cams and/or shorter brace heights, which adds speed but makes them more difficult to shoot well.

Will my draw length increase when I turn the poundage up?
Tightening the limb bolts will slightly reduce draw length, but probably not enough to notice.
 

nphunter

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Your draw length will slightly decrease as you tighten up your limbs. They come somewhat closer to the riser as they go up to make them tighter. I'm sure it would be measurable going from 53 to probably 62ish which is what the bow will max out at. This was much more noticeable on bows before having parallel limbs but tightening limbs still decreases draw length and loosening them increases draw length.

Bows are more efficient at the top end of the cams, I'm not sure how much limb tightness matters on today's bows. It's easier for a bow to be more consistently tightened down but that is because everything is even and there is arguably less play when the bolts are all tight. I doubt 99% of people could tell the difference on most bows as long as the timing and nock travel is in spec wherever the bow is set. If one limb is slightly looser than the other it can cause tuning issues, (or resolve them), people tiller tune by adjusting limb pressure if they cannot get rid of poor nock travel, but this isn't very common anymore.

Bows with cable shops are easier to be more consistent with at higher draw weights due to there being more tension on the cables making the back wall stiffer and harder to manipulate pulling into it. They also sometimes hold steadier because of more holding weight which decreases the load on your bow arm, this is why target guys a lot of times shoot lower letoff. They also offer more energy which in turn makes them slightly more forgiving if you make a poor shot, IMO this is marginal at best poor shots normally don't turn out well regardless of draw weight. None of this matters if you can't easily draw the bow and shoot it accurately, accuracy comes from practice which you can do more of with a lighter draw weight.

The most important factor in hunting is shot placement so shoot the bow where you can comfortably shoot it a lot. If 53lbs is all you can pull comfortably and shoot well then leave it alone. The ERA is going to be a more forgiving bow and probably much easier to draw at the same weight, it requires you to pull it 1.25" less since it has a 7.25" brace height vs a 6". It's also slower which means it will be easier to draw. It might be just as easy to shoot the ERA at 60lbs as the Omnia at 55lbs in which case your speeds will be similar anyways.

Personally, if it were me I would just have a set of 50-60lb limbs put on the ERA since you will probably never be shooting 70lbs and the ERA with 60lb limbs can max around 62-63lbs if you wanted it to.

You are at a disadvantage compared to most archers when it comes to energy, for deer I wouldn't worry at all but if you are hunting elk with that bow make sure you're shooting a good cut on contact head like a kudu, german jager, or similar. Your main focus should be just like everyone else, focus on accuracy and shot placement, hold 4" off the shoulder to avoid hitting bone and you will be perfectly fine.

My son is shooting a slower bow than you at 45-50lbs the last couple of years but he has a 29" draw, he's passed through a couple of nice 4-point mule deer bucks with a 420gr arrow tipped with a 3-blade expandable. He also carries a couple of fixed heads in his quiver for elk hunting.
 
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ofl0926

ofl0926

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May 23, 2015
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miami, fl
Your draw length will slightly decrease as you tighten up your limbs. They come somewhat closer to the riser as they go up to make them tighter. I'm sure it would be measurable going from 53 to probably 62ish which is what the bow will max out at. This was much more noticeable on bows before having parallel limbs but tightening limbs still decreases draw length and loosening them increases draw length.

Bows are more efficient at the top end of the cams, I'm not sure how much limb tightness matters on today's bows. It's easier for a bow to be more consistently tightened down but that is because everything is even and there is arguably less play when the bolts are all tight. I doubt 99% of people could tell the difference on most bows as long as the timing and nock travel is in spec wherever the bow is set. If one limb is slightly looser than the other it can cause tuning issues, (or resolve them), people tiller tune by adjusting limb pressure if they cannot get rid of poor nock travel, but this isn't very common anymore.

Bows with cable shops are easier to be more consistent with at higher draw weights due to there being more tension on the cables making the back wall stiffer and harder to manipulate pulling into it. They also sometimes hold steadier because of more holding weight which decreases the load on your bow arm, this is why target guys a lot of times shoot lower letoff. They also offer more energy which in turn makes them slightly more forgiving if you make a poor shot, IMO this is marginal at best poor shots normally don't turn out well regardless of draw weight. None of this matters if you can't easily draw the bow and shoot it accurately, accuracy comes from practice which you can do more of with a lighter draw weight.

The most important factor in hunting is shot placement so shoot the bow where you can comfortably shoot it a lot. If 53lbs is all you can pull comfortably and shoot well then leave it alone. The ERA is going to be a more forgiving bow and probably much easier to draw at the same weight, it requires you to pull it 1.25" less since it has a 7.25" brace height vs a 6". It's also slower which means it will be easier to draw. It might be just as easy to shoot the ERA at 60lbs as the Omnia at 55lbs in which case your speeds will be similar anyways.

Personally, if it were me I would just have a set of 50-60lb limbs put on the ERA since you will probably never be shooting 70lbs and the ERA with 60lb limbs can max around 62-63lbs if you wanted it to.

You are at a disadvantage compared to most archers when it comes to energy, for deer I wouldn't worry at all but if you are hunting elk with that bow make sure you're shooting a good cut on contact head like a kudu, german jager, or similar. Your main focus should be just like everyone else, focus on accuracy and shot placement, hold 4" off the shoulder to avoid hitting bone and you will be perfectly fine.

My son is shooting a slower bow than you at 45-50lbs the last couple of years but he has a 29" draw, he's passed through a couple of nice 4-point mule deer bucks with a 420gr arrow tipped with a 3-blade expandable. He also carries a couple of fixed heads in his quiver for elk hunting.

I appreciate the insight on this.
On the broadheads subject, I was thinking of subbing something like an iron will broadhead left bevel. How do those broadheads that you recommend compare to the iron will? I will be primarily hunting elk. Should I look at mechanical as well?


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Beendare

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May 6, 2014
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Corripe cervisiam
@Mighty Mouse ’s first statement is key.

Your technique and shooting ability far out weighs any minor bow changes. Concentrate on You, your form, alignment, technique and release…..not the bow.

👆🏼Thats assuming you are starting with a BH tuned bow.
 

nphunter

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Jul 27, 2016
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Location
Oregon
I appreciate the insight on this.
On the broadheads subject, I was thinking of subbing something like an iron will broadhead left bevel. How do those broadheads that you recommend compare to the iron will? I will be primarily hunting elk. Should I look at mechanical as well?


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I wouldn't shoot expandables if I were you and I love expendables. Those other heads will perform just as well as an IW and cost about 1/4 the price. The IW are great heads, I've shot them but ended up selling all of them just because I didn't like the cost or the fact that they rust easily. The Kudu is also a single bevel but I'm not sure if they offer LH bevel heads, I don't think it matters what bevel they are. I'm not really sold on the single bevel heads either, I do shoot them out of my recurve but that's because I needed a 200gr head and most of them are single bevel.
 
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BKM

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I’ve moved back to 58# for hunting I’ve shot as much as 75lbs and while hunting I’ve seen zero difference.

Match your broadhead to your arrow weight/speed and hunt
 
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