Montana state land that’s being farmed- etiquette

Silveroddo

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Question on how one is supposed to treat state land that’s being leased for agriculture in Montana, are there things a guy needs to know about it, or just use common sense and hunt away? Seems like block management rules apply to state land within a block management unit, I.E in a type 1 you’d still have to sign in prior to hunting a state section…… but I haven’t really found definitive information on the subject. For the sake of discussion let’s include BLM. In the past we’ve just used common sense and applied what we know out of the book, but it’s a lingering thought in the back of my mind.
 

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Silveroddo

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And the screen shot is literally just a random screenshot for all the cyber sleuths out there
 

kowboy

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My opinion is always to 'use common sense'. Be mindful of when activities are going on, trampling, etc. Nothing use to drive me more crazy than when I'd give permission on private land and someone would walk through the hay or knock down corn.
 

roadrunner

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Depends on the rules of the land management agency of what you're supposed to do with your activity against the ag leasee's activity. Sometimes a state ag lease gives them sole discretion over surface usage, so you almost have to treat it like private and seek permission.

Again, depends on the agency and rules of the lease.
 
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Silveroddo

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This is the type of thing I've looked for in the past and not really found, looks like if its closed to recreational use it has to be posted as such.
Link to the regs


If all or a portion of a tract of trust land is closed, it is closed to All Recreational Uses by All parties.
Categorical Closures:
  • Upon receipt of a valid request for closure of a specific tract of state land, DNRC may, after an opportunity for a public hearing, categorically close the land for any of the following reasons or conditions.
    • Disruption of livestock
    • Weed control
    • Damage to surface improvements of the lessee
    • Wildlife protection
    • The presence of unique or special cultural or natural features
    • The presence of threatened, endangered or sensitive plant or animal species or communities
    • The presence of buildings, structures or facilities
    • If recreational use would diminish the income generating potential of the state land
  • Categorical closures can be temporary, seasonal, or permanent.
Management Closures/Restrictions
  • State land can be temporarily closed, or recreational use restricted, if any of the following conditions exist that would interfere with the lessees management of those lands.
    • Concentration of livestock for special/intensive breeding or for calving, lambing, shipping, weaning
    • Livestock being gathered or moved
    • Recent weed control treatments
    • Active irrigation (however, irrigated land is not closed to foot traffic during hunting season)
  • Land close to a lessee’s dwelling, structures or other facilities may be closed or restricted except for the purpose of entering or leaving the state lands.
  • Lands closed to recreational use must be posted at all customary access points.
 

MT_Wyatt

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I’ve never had a problem but have only rolled out there in late dec and January (ie farmed fields that are State lands) for geese. Sometimes there’s really old blue state lands signs on fields, which is more of a warm fuzzy.

I’ve had this same question so good idea asking, curious what other experiences have been.

I’ve seen dudes driving on these fields for waterfowl setup and as I understand it, that’s a no go.
 

Dust Rider

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Certain sections may have specific regulations as to weapons restriction, or specific conditions. There should be a white sigh with a red middle section of sign stating conditions of the section at main entrance. Corner sections used to be marked In blue, some still have the old marker signs.
You could call the local DNRC office, but I dont think they answer their phones anymore. We always respect the land like it’s ours, use common sense and read signage.
 
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S.Clancy

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In MT, leasing the ground for Ag purposes does not give the leasee access control, though some will try to assert that is true. We have a "State Lands" stamp (its part of the Sportsmans package and any NR combo includes it) that allows permission on all State School sections. If you have the stamp and someone tries to bully you out, stand your ground and call the GW.

Different state sections have different rules, but in general allow none or very limited motorized access. They also have different rules for weapons, with many requiring short range weapons (shotgun/bow only) near houses/town and more remote ones being open to any legal weapon. Generally, there will be a sign on the road that denotes access and weapon restrictions of the State land piece.

As for land ethic, show all land the proper respect. Pack it in, pack it out, no trace.
 

Dos Perros

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I don't understand the question...like what could the OP possibly do that could be in conflict with the farmer?
 
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Silveroddo

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It’s just a system I’m not familiar with, S. Clancy and the info on the state website kind of cover the questions I’ve had in the back of my mind about what a farmer is entitled to as the renter. Just don’t want to end up somewhere I’m not supposed to be.
 

justjonesin

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Call or stop by any local state office and they’ll set you straight on any questions you might have, they’re generally incredibly helpful humans.
 
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