CO beetle Kill // 10+ year old burn area for elk

Joined
Sep 27, 2018
Messages
18
Location
TN
Hey all, I've got a question that maybe some more experienced folks can shed some light on. I've looked at aerial imagry, google earth, and hunt platforms till i'm red in the face in two particular units in CO. (77/78)

78 has the massive west fork fire from 2013 and the google earth imagry makes it look like there is a ton of down timber, but the images are pretty old (2016-2019). I don't want to be walking through a match stick box. Anyone know how this weminuche wilderness area looks as of the past couple years.

77 on the other hand looks just as bad on the downed timber front. No fire, just beetles ravaging as usual.

Also, what is the consensus on hunting really old burns? I'd imagine once the timber starts hitting the ground it becomes way more of a pain to navigate than what it's worth.
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2017
Messages
451
Location
Wyoming
I would guess it's a bit of a mess through there. There's probably no shortage of elk in there either though. If you could cut some routes through (probably not feasible), it might give you an edge.
 

Kyle C

Lil-Rokslider
Joined
May 28, 2017
Messages
229
Location
Puyallup WA
All I'll say is some of the most awesome and productive areas I've found without pressure in any state I've hunted are miles into that type of S**t that not many are willing to cross or go through. In this case I truly believe the "grass is always greener on the other side".
 

Caseknife

Lil-Rokslider
Joined
Feb 22, 2020
Messages
274
Surprising how well the elk navigate the down timber within a few weeks of the event. Get on the tracks and they will guide you through, definitely will not be in a straight line though. The regen is what makes it difficult.
 

Gapmaster

WKR
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Dec 22, 2019
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386
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MERICA!!
In my experience, the edges of those burns are a nightmare maze of logs and half fallen trees. Once you get into the actual burns they seem to be easier to navigate because most of the downed timber is limbless. But “easier” doesn’t mean easy. If you’re gonna hunt that stuff, throw some puncture wound first aid articles in your pack. 1-2 tampons and some blood clot agents. Hopefully you wouldn’t need it but those trees are a stab wound waiting to happen.
 

11boo

WKR
Joined
Feb 24, 2016
Messages
2,407
Location
Grand Jct, CO
In my experience, the edges of those burns are a nightmare maze of logs and half fallen trees. Once you get into the actual burns they seem to be easier to navigate because most of the downed timber is limbless. But “easier” doesn’t mean easy. If you’re gonna hunt that stuff, throw some puncture wound first aid articles in your pack. 1-2 tampons and some blood clot agents. Hopefully you wouldn’t need it but those trees are a stab wound waiting to happen.
I used to walk the blowdown like a tightrope. Incredible I survived that phase of life.
 

Gapmaster

WKR
Joined
Dec 22, 2019
Messages
386
Location
MERICA!!
I used to walk the blowdown like a tightrope. Incredible I survived that phase of life.
Same here, but age has given me a sense of mortality. I’m much more careful than I used to be. That stuff is tough on everything from the body to the gear. Don’t know why I keep hunting it honestly.
 

TheHammer

WKR
Joined
Aug 1, 2022
Messages
601
Location
juneau wi
Best train with a loaded pack for blow down beetle kill, not just in those units but most of southern co. 78 had a decent fire last year on the southern border. If you can get away from the pressure it’s usually after venturing through miles of blow downs.
 
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