Bivy Vs. Tyvek Vs. CCF

Time2fish

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2020
Messages
99
I use a katabatic piñon bivy for sleeping in floorless shelters, and often carry a small piece of tyvek for gear to be stored on. If needed I keep a MLD DCF ground sheet in my pack at all times, and have slept on that too. The DCF ground sheet has stake out loops and doubles as a small rain fly or shelter if needed.
I really like the lightweight bivy since I often do what everyone else does and just keep my quilt and pad rolled up in it, and stuffed in the bottom of my pack.
I don’t believe Katabatic is fully American made anymore though. Still a great company with durable gear. The piñon bivy comes in many sizes.
My favorite part about floorless shelter is the dirt, not having to take my boots off or worried that my pack/clothes are too wet to bring in the tent.
Good luck and I think you will find floorless much more appealing once you get your system dialed.
 

Wapiti151

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Nov 14, 2020
Messages
427
Location
Nevada
I use a katabatic piñon bivy for sleeping in floorless shelters, and often carry a small piece of tyvek for gear to be stored on. If needed I keep a MLD DCF ground sheet in my pack at all times, and have slept on that too. The DCF ground sheet has stake out loops and doubles as a small rain fly or shelter if needed.
I really like the lightweight bivy since I often do what everyone else does and just keep my quilt and pad rolled up in it, and stuffed in the bottom of my pack.
I don’t believe Katabatic is fully American made anymore though. Still a great company with durable gear. The piñon bivy comes in many sizes.
My favorite part about floorless shelter is the dirt, not having to take my boots off or worried that my pack/clothes are too wet to bring in the tent.
Good luck and I think you will find floorless much more appealing once you get your system dialed.
Couldn’t agree more, I think the fact that you never have to worry about dirt accumulation or water pooling on the floor of the tent is the most overlooked advantage. I’ll never go back to a shelter with a floor. Ever.
 

Jimss

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Joined
Mar 6, 2015
Messages
1,962
A $3.00 sheet of painters plastic from Home Depot works great for me. I often use my 4 season fly off my Hilleberg with painters plastic during the early season or when there isn't snow or super wet conditions.
 
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OregonSteeler

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 5, 2017
Messages
257
Location
Portland, OR
I use a katabatic piñon bivy for sleeping in floorless shelters, and often carry a small piece of tyvek for gear to be stored on. If needed I keep a MLD DCF ground sheet in my pack at all times, and have slept on that too. The DCF ground sheet has stake out loops and doubles as a small rain fly or shelter if needed.
I really like the lightweight bivy since I often do what everyone else does and just keep my quilt and pad rolled up in it, and stuffed in the bottom of my pack.
I don’t believe Katabatic is fully American made anymore though. Still a great company with durable gear. The piñon bivy comes in many sizes.
My favorite part about floorless shelter is the dirt, not having to take my boots off or worried that my pack/clothes are too wet to bring in the tent.
Good luck and I think you will find floorless much more appealing once you get your system dialed.
Hey Time2Fish,

I'm liking g your recommendation for the Pinion Bivy. Good price point for waterproof bottom (their claim). Im wondering about the top material. Does it breath well enough without collecting condensation? The REI P.O.S. bivy I had was made of some crappy material and the top portion of the bivy got soaked from condensation.

Any other issues with that bivy?

Thanks!
 

Time2fish

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2020
Messages
99
Hey Time2Fish,

I'm liking g your recommendation for the Pinion Bivy. Good price point for waterproof bottom (their claim). Im wondering about the top material. Does it breath well enough without collecting condensation? The REI P.O.S. bivy I had was made of some crappy material and the top portion of the bivy got soaked from condensation.

Any other issues with that bivy?

Thanks!
I have had condensation issues, mostly on nights with a big temperature change, in late summer above tree line kind of temp changes. Condensation build up has a lot of factors to consider. I sleep really warm so I have to make sure I go to bed slightly chilly instead of waking up super sweaty. I’ve found wearing too much merino wool can transfer moisture out to my bivy walls also. Using the correct bag or quilt and don’t fully burrito yourself in all the warmest things in your bag is the key.
Condensation in a single wall floorless shelter is also a learning curve. I always over vent my bivy and my shelter to minimize it as much as possible.
Hope this helps.
 

Time2fish

Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2020
Messages
99
I forgot to mention, I’ve had no other issues with the Piñon bivy. I monstly sleep with my head out and the screen unzipped if bugs aren’t an issue. If bugs are an issue it pops up really easily.
 

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Mcnasty

Junior Member
Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
39
Location
Colorado
I do think a better bivy would be something I need to try. Thank you for the recommendation. I also looked into Jimmy Tarps bivy and seems to be out of business??
Check out UL Hiker, this might be the Jimmy Tarps folks reinvented. https://www.ebay.com/itm/324998124043?hash=item4bab65d20b:g:6qgAAOSwKDZhcc8s
For what its worth ( not a shelter product, but I ordered a Bottle holder and a PALS attachment for Kifaru hip belt from them that are both quality products.
 
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OregonSteeler

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 5, 2017
Messages
257
Location
Portland, OR
I forgot to mention, I’ve had no other issues with the Piñon bivy. I monstly sleep with my head out and the screen unzipped if bugs aren’t an issue. If bugs are an issue it pops up really easily.
I'm liking this setup more and more! Also like the idea of using just the bivy on easy summer and early fall trips.
 
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OregonSteeler

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Joined
Jun 5, 2017
Messages
257
Location
Portland, OR
I forgot to mention, I’ve had no other issues with the Piñon bivy. I monstly sleep with my head out and the screen unzipped if bugs aren’t an issue. If bugs are an issue it pops up really easily.
Thanks everyone and T2F! Just pulled the trigger on the Pinion bivy. Quick turn around time, reasonable price, and seems to check all the boxes for what I'm looking for. If I don't like it, please refer to my potential post in the Classifieds.
 
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OregonSteeler

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 5, 2017
Messages
257
Location
Portland, OR
Couldn’t agree more, I think the fact that you never have to worry about dirt accumulation or water pooling on the floor of the tent is the most overlooked advantage. I’ll never go back to a shelter with a floor. Ever.
Wapiti,

I'm thinking about this a bit more and im curious, what do you (and other people) like about a floorless so much more than a full tent? I see some advantages, but to be 150% floorless??

Thanks
 

moxford

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Sep 5, 2014
Messages
218
Location
San Jose, California, United States
Why do you want a floor? It collects dirt, have to take shoes on/off all the time sitting halfout, no ability to increase venting by raising the walls, no ability to run a stove in some configuration for warmth/drying, not really going to want to bring your geat inside if muddy, and you still need to worry about tears or wear and sometimes a groundsheet.

And you carry it 100% of the time.

Floorless is far more versatile, lighter, and with the exception of bugs, IMO, better all around (if you can stake into the ground.)

Small sheet of windowfile/polycro for under the sleeping stack and in most cases you are good to go. Make your sheet as big as you want. If bugs are a problem, get a half nest. Condensation, get a full nest.

It is not perfect everywhere, but the flexibility is really nice.

Pouring rain? Unzip and just walk in, boots on.

Snow? Unzip, walk in, boots on. Sit in the snow chair that you have built up or lounge that you have dug down and sculpted out. (Usually end up with small seated snow table inside if multiple days...)
 
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