Wall tents

Pony Soldier

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Dec 31, 2021
Messages
809
Location
Montana
Two thirds of life is conditioned by what you lived through so---. I'm not asking for anything but thought I might share a little. I see ads on sale of tents but they seem to lack some critical details.
1. Fire proof or canvas? I started with a surplus canvas wall tent. I sprayed it down with a waxy sealant as we get rain early in the season. A guest came to hunt with us got a little enthusiastic and fed the stove too much. We had larch needles near the stove jack. They ignited and burmed the tent down. The new tent is fire proof but heavier.
2. Stove jack in the roof or end of the tent? Roof stove jacks tend to accumulate conifer needles and provide a fire risk. They can also channel rain into the tent. You have choices of metal and non-metal. The latter are sewn in and cause less misery. I suggest having the jack in the end near the door. This will cost you a little extra pipe that goes horizontal but with a little wire and a stick you can have a sock dryer under the pipe.

3. Sidewalls. Sidewalls can come in many varieties. I suggest 5 ft sidewalls. I have had 4 ft sidewalls and you can live with them. Less than that is like living in an attic. Unless you are really short - opt for the higher ones.

4. Rain fly. I use a canvas cover over the tent that I raise up about 6-8" above the tent edges and about 18-20" beyond. This keeps the snow away from the tent edges and will help with breaking camp. The fly will also keep your breath from freezing on the tent ceiling that will turn into a rainstorm when you light the stove in the morning. By extending the fly out the front by 10-12 ft you can have a heated kitchen without making your clothes smell. Or make a covered passage to the cook tent. Your choice!

I also use canvas tarps for the sleeping area to keep the sleeping bags clean.

I've never tried plastic tarps but I use them on my hay and have been disappointed over the years. Granted these are truck camps and horse camps unless you have collection of porters.
5. Ceiling rope. I run a ceiling rope under the roof support that hangs down about 4-6". This supprts drying coats, underwear, socks, etc. at night. During the day while I am hunting, I hang my sleeping bags to dry and elimonate any rodent/ bug problems. I have down bags and it fluffs them up along with the pillows.

Using this system I have survived heavy wet snowfall, high winds and -40 nights. I'm in heavy timber and cut my tent poles on site. Internal metal tent frames are yours to test.
 

hunterjmj

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 3, 2019
Messages
627
Location
Montana
Been running a stove pipe through the roof since I was a kid. Rain can get in but it's never been an issue. I don't live in a rainy area either. My tent has an internal metal frame. Again, not a problem as I don't pack in. I had a really nice heavy duty, black, rain fly made for mine and it's been great for 20 years. I've always put a blue tarp down on the dirt then cover that with green indoor/outdoor carpet. I've upgraded all the guy lines and never pack it up wet.
 

chadlove

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2022
Messages
18
The rain that comes in around stove pipe hits the stove and turns into steem, acts like a Humidifier and helps keep your sinuses from drying out. If you run the pipe out the side you should keep a pot of water on the stove.
 
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