Used Travel Trailers??

Billinsd

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I know travel trailers aren't built well to begin with. Is buying a used trailer more or less of a gamble than a truck? Ideally, it would be nice to buy a used trailer in good shape that's considerably less expensive as new. I'm interested in primarily 9,000 lb trailer trailers to 7,000lb. Thanks Bill
 

Red Letters

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Buying your first trailer is a bit of a gamble I guess, after you’ve been around them you know better what the known issues are and what problems to look for while you’re buying. Same with with used cars, the first ones you buy you are not very well educated in the process, that gets better with experience.
I really like the all aluminum/composite RV’s, no issues with rot to the framing/structural, but they cost more.
On the other side working on RV’s is not hard at all, most everything can be accessed by removing panels, I haven’t had to do many repairs but I can’t stop customizing mine.
 

swavescatter

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Buying. 2-3 year old camper that’s been well cared for is the ticket. The first couple of years are usually spent at the dealership rebuilding the unit and correcting all the shoddy workmanship. After that they’re usually pretty ok.
 

Shimmybro3

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A lot of people buy them, put them in long term storage, use them once a year - those are the ones you should buy. They’re still junk, but it’s less used junk. It’s just part of it, they’re not hard to work on. If you’re that worried, buy one without slides.
 

Turkeygetpwnd38

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I just got one a couple of months ago. I wanted to buy used but ended up with a new one. Maybe I just didn’t search hard enough for a deal but everything that I could find used in good condition was only 5-10% less than new. I figured it was worth it to get the new, have the year warranty to get everything fixed that’s broken out the gate.
 
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Billinsd

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A lot of people buy them, put them in long term storage, use them once a year - those are the ones you should buy. They’re still junk, but it’s less used junk. It’s just part of it, they’re not hard to work on. If you’re that worried, buy one without slides.
I'm worried, because I don't know much about them. I always worry about throwing money away, that's how I roll, lol.
 

Finch

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I'm worried, because I don't know much about them. I always worry about throwing money away, that's how I roll, lol.
I'd say most ppl do throw money away on travel trailers. They might take them out a couple times a year. Not a good return on investment in my mind. We bought a used Pop up several years back and try to use it 4 to 5 times a year. That is a realistic figure...I'd love to use it more but you know....life gets in the way. It absolutely gets old putting up and tearing down a pop up but we still do it b/c it gets us out.

If I were to have bought a newer travel trailer, I would have only gotten to use it a few times so far. Might as well take that money and go rent a nice cabin somewhere.

Maybe when the kids are gone and retirement hits, I'll have a nice trailer. Also, COVID made everyone realize they wanted to be in the outdoors. Sucks for the ppl that loved doing it before COVID. Hard to find places now unless you boondock. We still enjoy campgrounds for the kids but aren't opposed to boondocking when we can.
 

Shimmybro3

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I'd say most ppl do throw money away on travel trailers. They might take them out a couple times a year. Not a good return on investment in my mind. We bought a used Pop up several years back and try to use it 4 to 5 times a year. That is a realistic figure...I'd love to use it more but you know....life gets in the way. It absolutely gets old putting up and tearing down a pop up but we still do it b/c it gets us out.

If I were to have bought a newer travel trailer, I would have only gotten to use it a few times so far. Might as well take that money and go rent a nice cabin somewhere.

Maybe when the kids are gone and retirement hits, I'll have a nice trailer. Also, COVID made everyone realize they wanted to be in the outdoors. Sucks for the ppl that loved doing it before COVID. Hard to find places now unless you boondock. We still enjoy campgrounds for the kids but aren't opposed to boondocking when we can.
Most places up here won't let you camp with a pop up because of the bears - depending on where you live this is something to consider.

Most people lose money on campers, somehow I bought mine at the right time and sold it at the peak. I paid 8100 for mine, used it extensively, and then sold it in two days for 12,500. Luck mostly.
 

wyosteve

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My suggestion is to look for a used one that meets your needs vs. a new one. Let someone else eat the depreciation. Regardless of used or new, you're going to be doing some repairs/maintenance. My current unit is a 2013 that was a one owner, stored inside except when being used and already had a second air conditioner and receiver hitch installed. 2 tvs. and a Dish dome with new 12 ply tires. Paid less than half of what a new one costs. Most people don't use them enough to justify the depreciation on a new one.
 

CCooper

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Early 2000's Holiday Ramblers and Sunnybrook's were some of the best quality bumper-pull travel trailers built according to my RV repair guy.- Which also means they are heavy for what they are.
 

timekiller13

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Everyone says travel trailers/5th wheels suck and are poorly built.

I’ve owned 3. 2 new and one used, plus a pop up.

Never had a single issue out of any of them.

I camp10-12x per year and tow my 5th wheel a total of about 5k miles a year. So I use it pretty often.

Only issue I have ever had was a wire that was rubbing on a slide. Easily fixed with electrical tape.

For reference I’ve owned 2 Jayco travel trailers, a Jayco pop up and a Forest river 5th wheel (currently have this one)

Look at the roof. If it’s in bad shape (waves, crinkles etc) then move on. Also, check around vents inside (bathroom and kitchen) for leaks or wet spots.
 

CCH

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I think not too old/not too used is the way to go. Campers have a shelf life whether they are out being used or sitting in a yard. I would avoid anything made during the pandemic era 20-22. As crappy a job as they normally do cranking things out in Indiana, I have to believe whatever QC they had got thrown out the window as they raced to fill orders. Some brands are better. We went with a barely used Arctic Fox and have been very happy with it, and have owned many different campers over the years to compare it to. Nash (same company as Arctic Fox) and Outdoors RV are also built to a higher standard.

As mentioned, that quality tends to come in a heavier package. I'm assuming you're giving your truck a lot of cushion with that trailer weight? I have found living in Colorado where both altitude and grade are serious issues, going much above 50% of my rated tow capacity makes for a much less comfortable tow.
 
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Billinsd

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Crazy thing is they don’t come with any instructions so you have to figure everything out yourself but once you do it straight forward
I can make or do ANYTHING if there's a good instructional video on youtube!
 
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Billinsd

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Most people lose money on campers, somehow I bought mine at the right time and sold it at the peak. I paid 8100 for mine, used it extensively, and then sold it in two days for 12,500. Luck mostly.
I figure I'll lose money. I don't want to lose A LOT of money. I'll retire in 3.5 years and be able to go on long trips. In another 5, 6, 7 years my wife will retire. My wife wants a big 5th wheel with the living room in front if we are going to live in it. I will start out on something around 20 ft I can safely pull with a half ton. I'll probably want to sell the truck and trailer to upgrade, so long as my wife and are good living in a trailer.
 

Dust Rider

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Your not buying it for a investment, it’s for enjoyment. We bought our second TT after a hail storm. They knocked 8k off for cosmetics. Random stuff and fixtures break but they are easy to fix if your handy. On our third now without many major issues.
Be patient and search hard you will find a good deal. People tend to sell them come late fall, and there are always the people who could just barely afford them or realize they hate RV’s.
 

Geewhiz

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The good thing about shopping for used campers is they they are all built so cheap that it is very easy to tell if one has been well taken care of. Make sure everything works before you hand over the cash.
 

wapitibob

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Partner just bought a 2017 Nash 25C, mint condition for 22,000; too heavy for a 1/2 ton but gives you an idea of pricing that can be found. I bought his 2008 Nash 17C for 10.
 
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