so I have an idea...........

ZuluBravo

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You’re going to get all the medics excited with this thread lol. I use a PJ SKED for whitetail here in NC. A SKEDCO or a FOXTROT litter are essentially what you’re taking about. You can find them used at a reasonable price but if you aren’t planning on carrying them (with your hands) then their size/weight may be excessive. You could use both as a starting point for making something out of HDPE. Belaying the sled on steep terrain is too easy as well.
 

Fatcamp

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nodakian

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I’ve used the dead sled. I’d like one a bit lighter but it was pretty good. Never packed it with me while hunting but thought about bringing it to spike camp.

View attachment 481556
This is pretty much what I have, the difference being mine has grommets and laces on the sides. This one could be lightened by replacing straps and buckles with laces, and, if only hauling parts instead of the whole critter, it could be cut by a couple feet. And the price is right.
 
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mtwarden

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the "dead sled" with the grommets is pretty darn close to what I'm going to pattern mine after- but thinner HDPE and a little smaller dimensions
 

BDRam16

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Exactly what I was going to post. They work pretty well for everything other than going over a log. Dragging anything heavy over a log sucks though.
 

fishslap

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the "dead sled" with the grommets is pretty darn close to what I'm going to pattern mine after- but thinner HDPE and a little smaller dimensions
I might be interested in copying your design once you’re done. What you describe might get the weight down to a packable level while maintaining functionality.
 
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mtwarden

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I might be interested in copying your design once you’re done. What you describe might get the weight down to a packable level while maintaining functionality.


That's the hope :D

I'm also hoping this can be something I can use for winter camping on snowshoes/skis. Store my pack in it and pull it when the going is good, if it starts getting a little technical/blowdown/etc ,I can put my pack back on and roll up the sled.

We'll see
 
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mtwarden

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Here's a made in MT version


Got one for my 85 year old grandfather this year, because he steadfastly refuses to quarter anything or to call in the cavalry. Unfortunately it didn't get used, but it looked solid.

I saw that one, looks good- I think I can shave a bit of weight off it though :) That one would likely be better with things like firewood or anything where you know it's going to get beat up pretty bad
 

finner

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I saw that one, looks good- I think I can shave a bit of weight off it though :) That one would likely be better with things like firewood or anything where you know it's going to get beat up pretty bad
The real problem with these packable sleds is you can't just yeet them down any downhills... solve that problem and you'll make a mint
 
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mtwarden

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The real problem with these packable sleds is you can't just yeet them down any downhills... solve that problem and you'll make a mint


well you could, but it wouldn't be pretty :D

my elk this year I had to go down about a 1/4 mile of steep stuff before hitting the road- by putting the sled ahead of me and hanging on the poles it was too bad getting it down (you wouldn't have wanted to let it slip out of your hands, that's for sure!)
 

fishslap

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The real problem with these packable sleds is you can't just yeet them down any downhills... solve that problem and you'll make a mint
I’m not a sled expert but would adding some rigid supports help, like backpack stays or sections of the plastic runners that go on the bottom of my ice fishing jet sled? Maybe they go on the inside just for stiffness. If that has any value, it could probably be kept light and a method to remove them for roll up could be devised (snap in and out using big garments snaps?).
 

Laramie

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I have tried sleds and carts. For me, where I hunt, it is just easier to put in on my back. Blowdown, uneven terrain, and steep inclines become more trouble with a sled or cart than they are worth imo. If you are packing down a closed road or trail, that's a different story.
 

BigSkyHntr

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I help one of my younger brothers get a bull this year and we quartered it all up and I put a hind quarter on my back and wrapped/tied 2 more quarters plus loose meat etc. in the hide and used it as a sled. We were able to “move” the whole elk downhill at least a quarter mile in one trip until we met my Dad and another brother to help out! It was quite a load but it worked since the hill was steep enough. The hide definitely didn’t slide as well as the jet sled my dad brought up tho!
Edit: sorry, this is in response to a question above about using the hide as a sled.. not sure how to ‘quote’ a message a whatever ya call it 😀
 

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mtwarden

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I’m not a sled expert but would adding some rigid supports help, like backpack stays or sections of the plastic runners that go on the bottom of my ice fishing jet sled? Maybe they go on the inside just for stiffness. If that has any value, it could probably be kept light and a method to remove them for roll up could be devised (snap in and out using big garments snaps?).

possible it could help, many of the pulks sold come with runners or runners as an option

I have tried sleds and carts. For me, where I hunt, it is just easier to put in on my back. Blowdown, uneven terrain, and steep inclines become more trouble with a sled or cart than they are worth imo. If you are packing down a closed road or trail, that's a different story.

same here, but even it's 25% of the time- I think it would be worth it :D
 

Werty

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Going down hill can be done, just need to plan your route carefully. 1 cow quartered up, 1 trip out. Screenshot_20221130-100958_Gallery.jpg Screenshot_20221130-101031_Gallery.jpg
 

idelkslayer

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Theres 3 quarters plus the loose meat inside this elk hide (4th quarter is on my back). Dragged it 0.5 miles cross country and then 1 mile on a two-track road. All downhill except for a short 70 yard uphill drag to get on the road. There were times I had to get out of the way. I won't hesitate to use this method again.
Elk Hide Sled.jpg
 

rclouse79

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I have brought my jet sled with me on the hunt before when I was planning to walk a lot of snowy logging roads. It is nice to be ready if you are successful, but it I could see the sled getting in the way if you surprised some elk. Your idea is pretty good if it works.
 
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