Moving from Wyoming to N. Idaho

dank

Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2019
Messages
63
Location
Wyoming
Well it's pretty much official at this point. After spending the last 5 years in Wyoming it looks like I'll be moving somewhere in the panhandle. My parents live in Spokane and they are requiring more and more assistance these days so I know in my heart it's the right thing to do.

With that being said, I'm heartbroken over leaving Wyoming. I can't express how good this state has been to me and I have a real fear about the hunting being less than what I've come to be accustomed to. I really hope this fear is somewhat irrational and I'll be able to have similar success in the future. We'll just have to find out.

The one other positive (besides obviously being closer to family) is getting out of the desert/prairie. I really do miss living amongst the trees as I grew up in the forest. Wyoming is a beautiful state but the prairie doesn't do it for me like the forest does.

Anyway, excited for the next chapter but just hope I haven't been spoiled to bad by experiencing hunting in Wyoming the last 5 years.

Anybody make a similar move where it paid off?

P.S. I've read enough negativity on this forum about how CDA has ruined the panhandle and there's no game and the wolves will eat your whole family and you might as well just move to downtown LA.

I hope this stays positive as I'm just doing what I gotta do.
 

Selkirk6x

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2022
Messages
29
Haven't made the move, but I'm born and raised in the hills of Bonner co.

The hunting here has changed, especially over the last 10 years. Large influx of people on top of the things that are probably universal like mapping technologies and the proliferation of social media influencers. If you can go deep, though, it's still pretty good, and there is a lot of wild country. Idaho still has a pretty good relationship with timber companies and public access, though that's been changing as well. Can't say I blame the companies, as people don't respect their gates, and tear up roads, both in and out of hunting seasons.

You'll be looking at tags for elk (mostly antlered, a little bit of either sex), whitetail in the lower elevations, mulies (antlered only) up high, black bear, turkey, cats and wolves. Moose is a lottery, one per life. If you're an archer, elk "A" tag is the way to go, as it's a much longer season, with some any weapon and muzzy thrown in.

On a day to day basis, at least in the city of Sandpoint and surrounding areas, rentals seem to be quite expensive, and hard to come by. Real estate was idiotic for a couple years, but now seems to be adjusting to merely inflated, and also hard to come by.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Selkirk6x

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2022
Messages
29
I just saw your P.s. not sure if you've added it, or if I missed it before.

People have been saying CDA IS "ruining the panhandle" for all the decades of my memory. It's a town, with good and bad like any other. I've never lived there, but have plenty of experience.

As for wolves, they're here, but I have a pretty balanced view on them, as do most of the people I know who were hunting here before wolves. I honestly see a much larger impact from human pressure than I do from wolves.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
OP
dank

dank

Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2019
Messages
63
Location
Wyoming
Haven't made the move, but I'm born and raised in the hills of Bonner co.

The hunting here has changed, especially over the last 10 years. Large influx of people on top of the things that are probably universal like mapping technologies and the proliferation of social media influencers. If you can go deep, though, it's still pretty good, and there is a lot of wild country. Idaho still has a pretty good relationship with timber companies and public access, though that's been changing as well. Can't say I blame the companies, as people don't respect their gates, and tear up roads, both in and out of hunting seasons.

You'll be looking at tags for elk (mostly antlered, a little bit of either sex), whitetail in the lower elevations, mulies (antlered only) up high, black bear, turkey, cats and wolves. Moose is a lottery, one per life. If you're an archer, elk "A" tag is the way to go, as it's a much longer season, with some any weapon and muzzy thrown in.

On a day to day basis, at least in the city of Sandpoint and surrounding areas, rentals seem to be quite expensive, and hard to come by. Real estate was idiotic for a couple years, but now seems to be adjusting to merely inflated, and also hard to come by.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks for this post!

It's funny because I meet locals of Wyoming who have lived here for decades and they often wine about how the hunting is no good anymore and there's no game and too many hunters. It's like dude.. Hunt hard and there's animals.. seems pretty great to me. So I understand you have to take these things with a grain of salt and I'm hoping all the negativity surrounding N. Idaho is similar. I'm sure it's not what it was 30 years ago or whatever but I also don't have those experiences or expectations. I've always had to hunt hard and when I hunt hard it usually pays off.
 

Selkirk6x

Junior Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2022
Messages
29
Thanks for this post!

It's funny because I meet locals of Wyoming who have lived here for decades and they often wine about how the hunting is no good anymore and there's no game and too many hunters. It's like dude.. Hunt hard and there's animals.. seems pretty great to me. So I understand you have to take these things with a grain of salt and I'm hoping all the negativity surrounding N. Idaho is similar. I'm sure it's not what it was 30 years ago or whatever but I also don't have those experiences or expectations. I've always had to hunt hard and when I hunt hard it usually pays off.

You can't go back 30 years, but IDFG keeps harvest stats going back to 2001 or 2002, I think. (That's pre wolf, btw) Especially for elk, it's always been hard here in the panhandle if you don't have an alfalfa field.

The truth is, hunting was easier 20 years ago. All other details aside, I was 20 years younger wasn't running a business, didn't have as much going on day to day. 25 years was even easier, since that means I'd be skipping school to go to the mountains.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

wyosteve

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jul 1, 2014
Messages
1,591
Let us know how it goes once you get back into the trees. I've lived in prairie country so long that if I get in the trees, I almost start to feel claustrophobic because I can see for miles and miles!
 

hunterjmj

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 3, 2019
Messages
625
Location
Montana
Let us know how it goes once you get back into the trees. I've lived in prairie country so long that if I get in the trees, I almost start to feel claustrophobic because I can see for miles and miles!
I'm the same. Never lived in a forested type area but it makes me claustrophobic. I don't even like hunting heavily forested country. America is great though, you can live wherever you want. Good luck to you.
 

CRJR45

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Jun 24, 2022
Messages
334
Good luck with the move , I'm sure you're parents will appreciate it , and it is what you make of it . Could be worse , you could be down here in old foeggy-ville , Flo-reee-duh , LOL
 
OP
dank

dank

Member
Joined
Dec 9, 2019
Messages
63
Location
Wyoming
I'm the same. Never lived in a forested type area but it makes me claustrophobic. I don't even like hunting heavily forested country. America is great though, you can live wherever you want. Good luck to you.
Yup, my buddies out here say the same thing. The way I see it, it makes me feel more protected where as the prairie makes me feel exposed.
 

MattB

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Sep 29, 2012
Messages
4,297
Only because I personally know people that have went through this. None of the rest of their family and friends are there, so when you move them more than an hour or 2 away nobody comes to visit them, which is horrific on the mental health.
Not to mention leaving their doctors, which unfortunately becomes a thing at their age.
 
Joined
May 23, 2020
Messages
67
I’m mostly self taught but grew up here. It’s thick as shit mostly but that means you don’t have to see other hunters much. And it doesn’t take much to be separated from them. Whether it’s another ridge or another road. Lots and lots of options. Just have to play the people. I haven’t been very successful but that’s mostly on me. I see a bull every year.
 

PNWGATOR

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Oct 14, 2014
Messages
1,814
Location
USA
Hunting in North Idaho is nothing like hunting in Wyoming.

Second the suggestion of moving your parents to you.

This whole region has DRASTICALLY changed over the last 25 years.
 
Top