Heated Sleeping Bag Liner

robin1970

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 10, 2021
Messages
14
I watched a winter camping video where a guy used an electric blanket. It ate up batteries like crazy. I camped out on the lake ice fishing with my son twice this year. We were more than comfortable running a mr buddy heater while we were awake and combing a 0 and 20 degree bag while sleeping. Slept like a baby with temperatures below zero. It seems like a lot less headache than trying to run a system requiring multiple deep cycle batteries.
Ditto on doubling up sleeping bags. I've car camped below zero many times, using 2 bags, lots of clothing layers, wool booties, mittens, etc. My 2 bags are a EE 20 degree down and a 1980's REI winter down (don't no exact rating, probably 20).
Many report that hot water bottles work well. I bought a Nalgene winter bottle, but have not used it yet.
I watched a winter camping video where a guy used an electric blanket. It ate up batteries like crazy. I camped out on the lake ice fishing with my son twice this year. We were more than comfortable running a mr buddy heater while we were awake and combing a 0 and 20 degree bag while sleeping. Slept like a baby with temperatures below zero. It seems like a lot less headache than trying to run a system requiring multiple deep cycle batteries.

I watched a winter camping video where a guy used an electric blanket. It ate up batteries like crazy. I camped out on the lake ice fishing with my son twice this year. We were more than comfortable running a mr buddy heater while we were awake and combing a 0 and 20 degree bag while sleeping. Slept like a baby with temperatures below zero. It seems like a lot less headache than trying to run a system requiring multiple deep cycle batteries.
Ditto on doubling up sleeping bags. I've car camped below zero many times, using 2 bags, lots of clothing layers, wool booties, mittens, etc. My 2 bags are a EE 20 degree down and a 1980's REI winter down (don't know exact rating, probably 20).
Many report that hot water bottles work well. I bought a Nalgene winter bottle, but have not used it yet.
 

Patriot2

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 4, 2022
Messages
101
Location
Missouri
If you are on a cot the bottom side will REALLY suck your heat out - worse so than on the ground. If car camping I use a use a 3" thick foam pad and even on a cot I stay warm.
 

Afhunter1

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Mar 30, 2016
Messages
725
Location
South Central, PA
Why don’t u just get a stove that burns all night? Look up Nu-Way stoves. I got what I think is the 3500. Burns little fuel over night
 

Titan_Bow

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Dec 10, 2015
Messages
981
Location
Broomfield, CO
You mentioned you had your puffy pants and all the clothes you own on and were still cold. I’ve been cold weather camping a long time, but something I was taught years ago up at Fort Drum while spending some quality outdoor time when I was in the Army.. when it was below zero, get down to your base layers when getting in your bag. It seems counter intuitive, but I remember being woken up by my buddy, who did not take this advice, he climbed into his sleeping bag wearing every bit of clothing he had with him, and when he woke me up he was panicking he was so cold. I was comfortable in my bag. It makes a huge difference as it allows your body to heat the sleeping bag while moving moisture out. By wearing excess clothing layers, you are preventing your body heat from heating up the sleeping bag, and you are trapping your body’s moisture and possibly even causing you to sweat, which can be dangerous in sub zero temps. If you prevent your sleeping bag from working how it’s designed, you will be way less comfortable.


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You only live once

Junior Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2022
Messages
41
You mentioned you had your puffy pants and all the clothes you own on and were still cold. I’ve been cold weather camping a long time, but something I was taught years ago up at Fort Drum while spending some quality outdoor time when I was in the Army.. when it was below zero, get down to your base layers when getting in your bag. It seems counter intuitive, but I remember being woken up by my buddy, who did not take this advice, he climbed into his sleeping bag wearing every bit of clothing he had with him, and when he woke me up he was panicking he was so cold. I was comfortable in my bag. It makes a huge difference as it allows your body to heat the sleeping bag while moving moisture out. By wearing excess clothing layers, you are preventing your body heat from heating up the sleeping bag, and you are trapping your body’s moisture and possibly even causing you to sweat, which can be dangerous in sub zero temps. If you prevent your sleeping bag from working how it’s designed, you will be way less comfortable.


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True sometimes less is more.
 

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