First CA Black bear

J Batt

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Joined
Sep 13, 2018
Messages
295
Killed my first bear. Caught him terrorizing one of my favorite buck hunting spots.
Not sure how he stacks up but he seems huge to me.
Also, I wasn’t super careful about handling the game and eating trail mix with unwashed hands. Should I worry about worms? I may just get the medicine as prevention, but any input from more experienced bear hunters is welcome… 6A693DE0-4694-4434-B981-8FBCFA7675EC.jpeg
 

David Gough

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Joined
May 2, 2016
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465
Location
Reno, NV
I wouldn’t worry about worms more than any other big game animal.

You do need to cook the meat to 145 degrees for three minutes due to trichinosis.

Great bear!


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Cahunter805

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Oct 8, 2012
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2,033
Congrats. Any dead bear is a plus in CA. Looks like a good size bear. Any other pics?
 

TheGDog

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Jun 12, 2020
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2,808
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OC, CA
Nice Sized Head Man! (The Bear, hehe) Super Cool for a First One! Way to Go!
 

Brewski

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Joined
Apr 12, 2018
Messages
151
I wouldn’t worry about worms more than any other big game animal.

You do need to cook the meat to 145 degrees for three minutes due to trichinosis.

Great bear!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
145 is too low. At least 160F.
 

David Gough

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May 2, 2016
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Reno, NV
145 is too low. At least 160F.
"You can also kill any trichinae parasite by heat. And the “kill temperature” is a helluva lot cooler than you might think. The origin of the odd USDA mandated internal cooking temperature of 160°F appears to be the government trying to account for inaccuracy and idiocy. (That temperature is more relevant for salmonella than trich.) The actual temperature that kills the trichinella parasite is 137°F, which happens to be medium-rare."

 

Brewski

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Apr 12, 2018
Messages
151
"You can also kill any trichinae parasite by heat. And the “kill temperature” is a helluva lot cooler than you might think. The origin of the odd USDA mandated internal cooking temperature of 160°F appears to be the government trying to account for inaccuracy and idiocy. (That temperature is more relevant for salmonella than trich.) The actual temperature that kills the trichinella parasite is 137°F, which happens to be medium-rare."

Probably best to post all the info, later in that same article: "but you’d need to hold the meat at 137°F for an hour or so to make sure — and then you’d want to sear it on the outside to kill any possible bacteria that survived that low temp.."

So if you believe Hank Shaw over the USDA, and I do own Hanks cookbooks and generally follow his guidance, 140F holding for an hour. I don't want to babysit bear meat for an hour or risk it, so I usually quick sear and grill bear to 160F.
 

amassi

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Joined
May 26, 2018
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2,484
I like to sous vide bear meat. Plenty of temp to kill any tric bacteria. Then throw on a very hot cast iron to sear
 

David Gough

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Joined
May 2, 2016
Messages
465
Location
Reno, NV
Probably best to post all the info, later in that same article: "but you’d need to hold the meat at 137°F for an hour or so to make sure — and then you’d want to sear it on the outside to kill any possible bacteria that survived that low temp.."

So if you believe Hank Shaw over the USDA, and I do own Hanks cookbooks and generally follow his guidance, 140F holding for an hour. I don't want to babysit bear meat for an hour or risk it, so I usually quick sear and grill bear to 160F.
Most of mine gets turned into burger and the rest is used for stir fry. Never attempted to grill bear meat.
 

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