Colorado Archery Elk Pack List

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banded_drake

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Sep 10, 2019
Messages
141
Leave in truck: assess weather forecast at trailhead...if it's going to rain for days, bring the rain gear, if not, it's usually just quick t-storms...wait it out under a tree.

-Pack rain cover (store in tent at night if worried about it)
-Rain gear top/bottom
-Trekking Poles (in truck, but do you really need them to hike with a day pack? Grab them from truck on first trip out with meat
-stove
Spare knife (have the wife wear the 2nd knife)
-chair
-multi tool
-saw

Easily dropped 5lbs of gear.
The stove will most likely stay at the truck unless weather warrants it's use. I'll probably leave the spare knife behind too as I have my edge knife as well as a victorinox folding knife and my wife has a paring knife. I'm contemplating leaving the rain gear as well since we have a lightweight tarp in my wife's pack that can be easily deployed for shelter if need be.

Trekking poles I'm not sure on as we'll have a couple of miles to go in with all of our gear and about 2000 ft or so of elevation climb before we drop camp. If we do use them I agree I would not need them for day use until packing out.

The saw is one of those what if items, not sure if I'll need it for wood or if i would want to cut limbs to make a blind or something. Chair is just one of those comfort items. My scouting trip will let me know if it's really worth it but is definitely an item I will evaluate

I appreciate all the input, really helps me look at things in a different perspective

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Turkeygetpwnd38

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Aug 11, 2017
Messages
1,485
Location
Florida
1) Do not leave your trekking poles at the truck, they are worth their weight
2) Consider adding a second/backup release, preferably the same as your primary
3) You can drop 9-10ozs by replacing the sawtooth jacket with fleece mid layer. I tried the sawtooth and really didn’t care for it, heavy, not particularly warm and zero wind resistance (might of had previous model but still weight to warmth ratio is bad).

I’d leave what was previously mentioned at truck- stove, saw, chair, and crocs. Normally I’d say leave multi tool but like having on archery hunts, I’d keep the smart water bottle as well incase bladder fails. Glassing pillow and sleep pillow, could one of those be used for both? Have fun!
 
OP
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banded_drake

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Sep 10, 2019
Messages
141
1) Do not leave your trekking poles at the truck, they are worth their weight
2) Consider adding a second/backup release, preferably the same as your primary
3) You can drop 9-10ozs by replacing the sawtooth jacket with fleece mid layer. I tried the sawtooth and really didn’t care for it, heavy, not particularly warm and zero wind resistance (might of had previous model but still weight to warmth ratio is bad).

I’d leave what was previously mentioned at truck- stove, saw, chair, and crocs. Normally I’d say leave multi tool but like having on archery hunts, I’d keep the smart water bottle as well incase bladder fails. Glassing pillow and sleep pillow, could one of those be used for both? Have fun!
Excellent point of view. The trekking poles to me have a lot of value. We have a lightweight tarp in my wife's pack and I feel with the poles can be used to get us out of the rain if we get caught in a shower. Good point on the release, I do have an extra that I use at times I can throw in.

I've experimented with different tops and for the the Sawtooth fit better, provided the warmth I was looking for but doesn't feel bulky. I tried a couple other pieces and this one just worked better. I am considering leaving the mid layer fleece out, but, I really like my kuiu kenai vest and am thinking of taking it instead. I wear a vest a lot in temps down into the low 60s to upper 50s and as long as I'm moving it keeps me plenty warm over a LS.

My chair is probably something that is going go get left at camp. I actually kinda like it for just sitting around, and it's looking like my hunt will be more of a timber kind of hunt anyway.

The stove will also stay at the truck unless weather is going to be calling for it, and I think I left it out of my overall weight on my list.

Saw was one of those items I threw in as many people have recommended to have it. But I picked up a SOG Camp axe that will go in my wife's pack to double for cutting wood and as a hammer for ground stakes if needed for hard ground.

The glassing pillow came out and was gifted to my young boys to play with lol. The more I tried to use it the more I didn't like it, just doesn't really fit my butt, and isn't a great sleeping pillow. I'll just use some clothing or my pack to sit on while glassing if needed.

Thank you all for the replies, y'all have some very good input

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Vandy321

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
2,424
I'll just use some clothing or my pack to sit on while glassing if needed.

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No need to sit on the ground...thermarest Z-Seat weighs literally nothing (2oz) and is $14.
 

Jkr61

Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2019
Messages
67
Camp stove/axe for cutting wood depending on where you plan on hunting in Colorado don’t plan on being able to have a fire of any kind. Fire restrictions where I live (unit 14) do not allow for even a fire in a fire pit in my yard.
 

Dwight2180

Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2021
Messages
55
Keep the crocs.
Ditch the multitool.
What type of "trekking pole chair"?
I have no experience with that tent, but could you leave the pole and cut one to size at camp...if you are gonna have a saw anyways?
 

jlsmith214

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2021
Messages
13
I feel like your weight looked good.. especially with some of that being split between you two. If you’re worried about weight there are definitely some comfort items you could leave, but that is up to you. For me keeping some of those things is good for keeping my spirits up. That equals more time hunting for me.
 

p0under99

Junior Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2019
Messages
22
Go hunt just came out with an article that has a spreadsheet that you can down load. You can enter all your gear and the weight. it’ll give you a graph as well as sections to modify
 

Grant K

Member
Joined
Sep 19, 2017
Messages
60
Location
Ridgway, CO
Given that you are only spiking in for a couple of days I'd ditch all spares, just go get them out of your truck if needed... I'd also ditch the battery pack, no need for a pound of unneeded weight, keep your phone in airplane mode and it should last 3-4 days... I'd also for sure ditch the saw, multitool, second water bottle, glassing pad, and probably the liner for the quilt, you have a ton of clothes, you probably don't need that...

I'd have all of those clothes in the truck but I'd make a game-time call on how many of them to bring, I've gone weeks during archery season without raingear or gaiters, if you have a good forecast for the next couple of days I wouldn't be packing any of that or a rain cover for the pack, worst case you make a midday run to the truck and change out if something isn't working...
 

dlee56

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Feb 8, 2021
Messages
402
Location
Colorado
From reading what a few guys would leave behind seems like the max you could drop is around 5lbs. Sounds like you aren't be planning on bivy hunting so you won't be carrying everything everyday. With that in mind the only thing I would cut is the tent stove.

Don't forget that this is a fun trip and its cool to take a day or at least a half day to hang out at camp, worth upping the weight to me from 55 to 60 if that means some more comfort and enjoyment.
 

BigNate

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Dec 24, 2020
Messages
143
Location
Athol, Id. USA
If you're not going that deep in, walking out to the truck isn't a deal breaker. We often have stuff in the truck to set up a real camp if needed.

Years ago a friend of mine and I walked about six miles in. Got hit with a freak storm that devastated our camp, buried the tents, and broke off a ponderosa that I couldn't even wrap my arms 2/3s around, and it fell over my tent and just missed his. We were safely at the trailhead, in a tent.

The reason I bring this up is this. I have become a bit more of a minimalist knowing that I can bail if need be. If you are really far out or dropped in, I'd cache a few things ahead. Then bring whatever you want later. I like having a saw or hatchet along, you don't each need one. A ultralight tarp and cord can improvise shelter. A water filter beats carrying water, and if there isn't any to filter what is your quarry doing for water? Your scouting trip is going to be invaluable as you'll be able to plan better. You may decide you want more stuff along than you can carry on the hunt. I'd cache what I could ahead.
Being willing to be a little uncomfortable can really lighten a pack.
 

CrossLaw

Newbie
Joined
Apr 23, 2021
Messages
4
Location
Kansas
Your pack list is pretty similar to the standard list for most, but I think you'll get a better idea of your worn weight, loaded pack weight, and consumables weight if you finish inputting the data. Also, there are a handful of items I'd consider worn weight more than pack weight, such as your trekking poles, range finder, and possibly one of your knives. You're likely to use those poles while carrying your loaded pack. You may have your rangefinder in a clothing pocket or bino harness depending on your setup. If you're going to have a knife in a pant pocket, I'd consider it worn weight. For me, I am more concerned about my pack weight (which I define as weight in/on my pack directly) than my total weight. One of the suggestions on here was to drop the extra knife and replace with a sharpener. I think that is a great idea for some folks but not me. If I'm carrying an extra knife, it's likely going to be in my pant pocket, which isn't a weight I'm concerned about, but if I had a sharpener, it's likely going to be kept in my pack, which is added weight to my pack and is what I personally want to keep light as possible.
 

ncossey

Junior Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2021
Messages
12
I never see this on anyone’s list, but I’d find some singles of the sizes your bow sight needs in Allen wrenches and tuck them away in your pocket. A couple different sizes will weigh less than an ounce or two if that at all and could save your hunt if you drop or hit your bow hard enough.

also, bring the Crocs man, being able to throw those on at camp at night is a game changer, and you can walk out into creeks to cool your feet off and not worry about shit jabbing in the bottom of your feet.
 

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