Can you shoot a bedded buck?

Would you shoot a bedded buck?


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    40

PhillyB

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What is everyones opinion on shooting a bedded buck where there is an open, clear shot without obstruction.

Say you put the sneak on this buck (forget the size of the deer for this conversation, lets pretend he is a shooter in your book). You are successful in your sneak and you are uphill of the buck at 35 yds behind him. He is looking the opposite direction of your position and is unaware of you. You have good cover with the wind in your favor for the time being.

What would you do?

mule_deer_bedded-buck_zps16361d9b.jpg
 
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Hardstalk

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I think if your above him the spine may be in the way of where you want your scalpal. Every circumstance is different. But I dont sit and wait if the proper area is visible/hittable. I see alot of guys wait them out and it is necessary is some cases. But if he is unaware and his heart is showing I think you have just as many variables as a standing shot. I consider it a plus when archery hunting because you know they cant jump or duck the arrow on ya. When rifle hunting you know the bullet will typically do more damage than the broadhead. (Some may argue that point)
 

Whisky

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Like already mentioned, every situation is different. But I learned my lesson on waiting out a buck. I had a shot while bedded but elected to wait for him to stand up. After some time passed I felt the wind turn and that was the end of that. If I have a confident shot now, I will be taking it vs waiting him out.
 
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PhillyB

PhillyB

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Like already mentioned, every situation is different. But I learned my lesson on waiting out a buck. I had a shot while bedded but elected to wait for him to stand up. After some time passed I felt the wind turn and that was the end of that. If I have a confident shot now, I will be taking it vs waiting him out.

I agree. The smallest shift in wind, and the opportunity is gone.
 

TXCO

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I have generally had bad luck on bedded animals especially mule deer. One particular point to understand is if their legs are tucked underneath or splayed to the side. This can alter the angle of the spine, rib cage, and vitals as the legs would be splayed away from you. Be very careful about that. All that being said, it sure doesnt take much to spook a deer at <40 yards and if a good shot is there you can take it. I just have always struggled getting the same penetration and avoiding hitting big bones.
 

larryschwartz

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I have no problem taking a shot at a bedded deer. However, I would probably not take this shot from this position for the following reasons; 1) with his front legs like they are he is covering up a good part of the vitals, and 2) I am not good enough/foolish enough to shoot an arrow at an animal 35 yards away from me when he is LOOKING STRAIGHT AT ME. Other than that I like the shot, the slight elevation isn't a problem.
 

HellsCanyon

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I have generally had bad luck on bedded animals especially mule deer. One particular point to understand is if their legs are tucked underneath or splayed to the side. This can alter the angle of the spine, rib cage, and vitals as the legs would be splayed away from you. Be very careful about that. All that being said, it sure doesnt take much to spook a deer at <40 yards and if a good shot is there you can take it. I just have always struggled getting the same penetration and avoiding hitting big bones.

Agreed. As long as you understand where the vitals are in relation to body position I'd say let her fly. When bedded the vitals are usually much lower to the ground. In the above pic I would aim for the left side of the horizontal crease or his front leg creates.
With a true broadside shot I know my setup with have no problem zipping through a front shoulder bone on a muledeer.

Mike
 
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PhillyB

PhillyB

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I have no problem taking a shot at a bedded deer. However, I would probably not take this shot from this position for the following reasons; 1) with his front legs like they are he is covering up a good part of the vitals, and 2) I am not good enough/foolish enough to shoot an arrow at an animal 35 yards away from me when he is LOOKING STRAIGHT AT ME. Other than that I like the shot, the slight elevation isn't a problem.

Larry- In my mock scenario, you would be behind him up the hill, opposite of where the photo was taken, looking down on him. Essentially, he would be looking away from you.
 

Shrek

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I think if your above him the spine may be in the way of where you want your scalpal. Every circumstance is different. But I dont sit and wait if the proper area is visible/hittable. I see alot of guys wait them out and it is necessary is some cases. But if he is unaware and his heart is showing I think you have just as many variables as a standing shot. I consider it a plus when archery hunting because you know they cant jump or duck the arrow on ya. When rifle hunting you know the bullet will typically do more damage than the broadhead. (Some may argue that point)

Spine shot is good in my book. You may have to put a second arrow in him to finish but he will be right there. The shot described is as good as it gets really. He is looking away and completely relaxed. No way he can move enough at the shot to mess up the hit. If you are competent with your bow that buck is yours. If you wait anything could blow him out of there. I've shot a lot of deer , whitetails , but still super spooky deer. I never wait for the perfect shot anymore. A couple of times I got cocky and waited for a deer to clear some brush instead of threading the shot between bushes and had them turn and go another direction and in another case suddenly start a chase with a doe he had been watching. First reasonable shot for me. I never wait anymore.
 

Backpack Hunter

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I have no problem taking a shot at a bedded deer. However, I would probably not take this shot from this position for the following reasons; 1) with his front legs like they are he is covering up a good part of the vitals, and 2) I am not good enough/foolish enough to shoot an arrow at an animal 35 yards away from me when he is LOOKING STRAIGHT AT ME. Other than that I like the shot, the slight elevation isn't a problem.

My thoughts exactly.

In the mock scenario given, the arrow would be on the way.
 

OR Archer

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If I have a clear shot into the vitals you can bet I'm sending that arrow home.
 

Sunspot

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If the angle is right, sweet spot exposed and within range, then let let it rip..
 

Coyote Commander

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Most guys arent gonna pass up a shot (any broadside shot) at a bedded buck.

Most guys also have no idea how much the geometry of the shoulder bones and spine changes on a bedded buck (ESPECIALLY with its legs tucked).

Most guys, will end up aiming, and hitting, too high, and too far back.

A bedded shot is doable, if the angles are right. And on a broadside bedded deer, the window is small. You greatly increase your odds with a quartering away angle. Especially if the legs are tucked.

Legs tucked or not, you have to be aware that the scapula will be sitting lower and more perpendicular to the ground, and the elbow will be in your way more on a bedded cervid. The key is that quartering angle to get around the elbow, and aiming lower than youd think to get under the scapula.
 

Coyote Commander

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Another thing to take into account, is the target laying more on its side, or more belly down?? That changes things too.
 

Coyote Commander

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In the picture the OP posted, a good portion of the vitals is covered by bone. Im very confident in my rigs ability to blow through bone (especially on deer), but nothing is guaranteed.

The buck in the picture, is a deer id wait to stand up on. Especially at longer distances.
 
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