Barnes TTSX vs TSX out of same gun....

Macintosh

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The op seemed to focus on accuracy. Id personally focus on terminal performance unless accuracy from one was simply terrible. Ttsx or LRX would be my strong preference for a mono like that because the tip is there to allow a larger cavity in the nose which aids in more reliable expansion. I dont have personal experience with the older non-tipped tsx but my understanding is most of the stories of non-expansion are from one of two situations—either a non-tipped TSX that failed to expand, or a shot where the impact velocity was too low for proper expansion. (Or a combination of these two)
Monos like that need high velocity to expand so keep impact velocity high (2000fps or even higher for most of barnes’ and similar bullets) and often step down to a lighter bullet for the added velocity. Even then they are going to create a smaller wound than most lead bullets, so a lung shot will be reliably fatal, it’ll just take a couple seconds for the animal to run out of oxygen; which is also often true ime with a bonded lead bullet. I choose copper bullets for other reasons, but strictly from a speed of death perspective a non-bonded lead bullet will kill faster.

Notable, the bc and sectional density on a copper bullet is lower than equivalent lead bullets, so they run out of velocity fast. Most standard cartridges are hard-pressed to maintain 2000fps past 350-400 yards. I generally get pass-throughs on deer sized game, but I know its quite common to catch the bullet under the off-side hide on elk and larger game on anything other than a double-lung hit.
 

SDHNTR

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The op seemed to focus on accuracy. Id personally focus on terminal performance unless accuracy from one was simply terrible. Ttsx or LRX would be my strong preference for a mono like that because the tip is there to allow a larger cavity in the nose which aids in more reliable expansion. I dont have personal experience with the older non-tipped tsx but my understanding is most of the stories of non-expansion are from one of two situations—either a non-tipped TSX that failed to expand, or a shot where the impact velocity was too low for proper expansion. (Or a combination of these two)
Monos like that need high velocity to expand so keep impact velocity high (2000fps or even higher for most of barnes’ and similar bullets) and often step down to a lighter bullet for the added velocity. Even then they are going to create a smaller wound than most lead bullets, so a lung shot will be reliably fatal, it’ll just take a couple seconds for the animal to run out of oxygen; which is also often true ime with a bonded lead bullet. I choose copper bullets for other reasons, but strictly from a speed of death perspective a non-bonded lead bullet will kill faster.

Notable, the bc and sectional density on a copper bullet is lower than equivalent lead bullets, so they run out of velocity fast. Most standard cartridges are hard-pressed to maintain 2000fps past 350-400 yards. I generally get pass-throughs on deer sized game, but I know its quite common to catch the bullet under the off-side hide on elk and larger game on anything other than a double-lung hit.
This is true.

Additionally, the BC is significantly lower on the TSX vs the TTSX, so even if they shoot “the same” at 100-200 yards, they naturally won’t at greater distances where BC matters.
 
OP
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The op seemed to focus on accuracy. Id personally focus on terminal performance unless accuracy from one was simply terrible. Ttsx or LRX would be my strong preference for a mono like that because the tip is there to allow a larger cavity in the nose which aids in more reliable expansion. I dont have personal experience with the older non-tipped tsx but my understanding is most of the stories of non-expansion are from one of two situations—either a non-tipped TSX that failed to expand, or a shot where the impact velocity was too low for proper expansion. (Or a combination of these two)
Monos like that need high velocity to expand so keep impact velocity high (2000fps or even higher for most of barnes’ and similar bullets) and often step down to a lighter bullet for the added velocity. Even then they are going to create a smaller wound than most lead bullets, so a lung shot will be reliably fatal, it’ll just take a couple seconds for the animal to run out of oxygen; which is also often true ime with a bonded lead bullet. I choose copper bullets for other reasons, but strictly from a speed of death perspective a non-bonded lead bullet will kill faster.

Notable, the bc and sectional density on a copper bullet is lower than equivalent lead bullets, so they run out of velocity fast. Most standard cartridges are hard-pressed to maintain 2000fps past 350-400 yards. I generally get pass-throughs on deer sized game, but I know its quite common to catch the bullet under the off-side hide on elk and larger game on anything other than a double-lung hit.
All good points. I won't be shooting past 300 yards and I think that distance bullet still making like 2,500 FPS. I'd like to THINK that she'll still open up at that speed, hence my question about accuracy with it vs the TTSX. Regardless, at $38 / box it was kinda hard to say no. Can always fall back on the accubonds that I picked up if need be.
 

Macintosh

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You didnt say what loads they were, but plug them into a calculator to see impact velocity and you’ll be sure. Lots of people try to keep them above 2200 fps on impact, thats often only 350 yards or so. Maybe more with a wsm, but probably not much past 400 unless you are up there in elevation. My 270win with 130gr ttsx at 3000fps muzzle is right at 2200fps at 350 yards at my elevation.
 
OP
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You didnt say what loads they were, but plug them into a calculator to see impact velocity and you’ll be sure. Lots of people try to keep them above 2200 fps on impact, thats often only 350 yards or so. Maybe more with a wsm, but probably not much past 400 unless you are up there in elevation. My 270win with 130gr ttsx at 3000fps muzzle is right at 2200fps at 350 yards at my elevation.
Yeah. 300 yards is 2,500 fps, like i thought. I’m not taking shots past that, so I’m thinking the non tipped copper bullet should open up satisfactorily.
 
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I know the gun shoots the noslers well. Will see how it likes the Barnes soon. Shot the accubond “long range” the other day and it was not all that great. Was in a hurry, though.




IMG_8790.jpegIMG_8791.jpegIMG_8792.jpeg
 

Marshfly

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As I mentioned, my gun loves the TTSX. But I had to shoot the Elk 4 times through the lungs, broadside. 180 yards. Good thing he didn't run, or I'd still be looking for him.

Now my bigger problem, I can't find lead ammo as accurate for this .308
I had this exact same thing happen with a bull at 250 yards last year. 4 TTSX from my 270 Win broadside through the lungs and the bull finally went down. Looked inside to see the (non)damage and swore never to shoot another animal with that junk again after reflecting on the last few animals killed with it.

The Federal loaded Berger Hybrid hunter isn't quite as accurate out of my rifle but that's my choice moving forward as the ELDX simply won't group out of the rifle.
 
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I had this exact same thing happen with a bull at 250 yards last year. 4 TTSX from my 270 Win broadside through the lungs and the bull finally went down. Looked inside to see the (non)damage and swore never to shoot another animal with that junk again after reflecting on the last few animals killed with it.

The Federal loaded Berger Hybrid hunter isn't quite as accurate out of my rifle but that's my choice moving forward as the ELDX simply won't group out of the rifle.

I tried about 10 boxes of various ammo. The swift groups Nicey. But I need more time with Swift.
Browning LR pro groups, but 40% of the cartridges refuse to go into battery. I tried some match bullets, but that was a waste as I'm not hunting with match rounds. It's a .308 Tikka.
 

Marshfly

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I tried about 10 boxes of various ammo. The swift groups Nicey. But I need more time with Swift.
Browning LR pro groups, but 40% of the cartridges refuse to go into battery. I tried some match bullets, but that was a waste as I'm not hunting with match rounds. It's a .308 Tikka.
The right match bullets will kill better than literally anything else made. Or go ELDX which is match bullet that says "hunting" on the box if it makes you feel better.
 

JFK

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The improved BC of the lrx bullets does help to preserve velocity.

Example from a 270win at 1,500’ elevation.
130gr TTSX muzzle velocity of 3050fps hits 2200fps at 360 yards.

129gr LRX muzzle velocity of 3056fps hits 2200fps at 475 yards.

Moving to 7000’ elevation you gain roughly 100 yards of distance before dropping below 2200fps.

If you handload and know your shots are 300 yards and in, the .277cal 110gr TTSX or 117gr hammers would be a good choice if you want to shoot a mono bullet.
 

deltadukman

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I have a 300wm that will shoot the Federal loaded untipped TSX's lights out. .50moa or better. The Barnes loaded TTSX's are 2-3 MOA and shot horribly.
 
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