Anchor question

huntingnt

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
17
Just getting back into bowhunting. I used to shoot traditional so I'm having to relearn a lot of technique moving to a compound.
One of the biggest problems I'm running into is finding a proper rear anchor. When I shot traditional I shot 3 fingers under and my anchor point were my index fingerin the corner of my mouth and my thumb knuckle under the corner of my jawbone.
Right now I'm running a trigger release and I'm touching the side of my nose for the front anchor but can't seem to find a good solid rear anchor.
Is there something I'm missing? Should I move to a thumb release? Would that change my front anchor?
Hope to hear soon.
Thanks
 

Marble

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
2,593
Just getting back into bowhunting. I used to shoot traditional so I'm having to relearn a lot of technique moving to a compound.
One of the biggest problems I'm running into is finding a proper rear anchor. When I shot traditional I shot 3 fingers under and my anchor point were my index fingerin the corner of my mouth and my thumb knuckle under the corner of my jawbone.
Right now I'm running a trigger release and I'm touching the side of my nose for the front anchor but can't seem to find a good solid rear anchor.
Is there something I'm missing? Should I move to a thumb release? Would that change my front anchor?
Hope to hear soon.
Thanks
It's hard to say where exactly you'll find that spot on your face/jaw for your anchor. It's easier for me to teach people to use the tip of their nose instead of the side, their peep and a 3rd spot that is to be determined based on your release type.

I dont like using the side of the nose for a few reasons. One, I don't think you can be as consistent when using the side vs using the tip and two, I want as little side pressure on my string as possible. It seems insignificant but that slight pressure on the string to the side causes torque in the string. The danger when using the tip is pushing it too hard into the string. This also is problematic.

IME, if I can get people to get a proper and comfortable anchor, and then get them to repeat it and understand why they are doing what they are doing, they will have more success.

If you use a handheld, an easy reference point for you is splitting the jaw line with the knuckles. Usually between the index and middle finger.

Sent from my SM-G986U using Tapatalk
 

OctoberGold

Member
Joined
Mar 31, 2016
Messages
92
Location
MN
For an index release anchor, I always hook my thumb behind jaw bone, string at the corner of my mouth, and just touch the tip of my nose to the string. I've seen some people get wild with their thumb tucked all the way behind their neck, but hooked on the jaw bone has always worked for me.
 

TxxAgg

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Dec 27, 2019
Messages
1,556
I use the tip of my nose, pins centered in peep, and pointer finger knuckle at back of my jaw under my ear.
 

trophyhill

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Joined
Feb 27, 2012
Messages
2,310
Location
Tijeras NM
I use the tip of my nose, pins centered in peep, and pointer finger knuckle at back of my jaw under my ear.
This^^^

String angle can play a role and definitely having the correct draw length set up. But what TxxAgg describes works for me. I have a 29” dl, 6” brace height and I run a very short d-loop on a 32” axle to axle bow.
 
OP
H

huntingnt

Junior Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2021
Messages
17
This^^^

String angle can play a role and definitely having the correct draw length set up. But what TxxAgg describes works for me. I have a 29” dl, 6” brace height and I run a very short d-loop on a 32” axle to axle bow.
Does that put you against the wall with draw length. Did you have to change your peep for a thumb release?
 

trophyhill

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Feb 27, 2012
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Location
Tijeras NM
Does that put you against the wall with draw length. Did you have to change your peep for a thumb release?
Everything is perfect on my D350. Actually I think it’s a little over 29” dl. I shoot a trigger release. My peep is a String Splitter peep that I absolutely love!
 

Marble

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Joined
May 29, 2019
Messages
2,593
Does that put you against the wall with draw length. Did you have to change your peep for a thumb release?
Being "against the wall" is what every draw length should set a shooter to be in.

Whenever you make a major change like changing release types, it can have an affect on everything. Most likely the draw length and peep position will change. The bow will also need to be sighted in again.
 

Evol

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Joined
Jul 2, 2018
Messages
252
Location
PA
If I move to a thumb release do you use a kisser button?
Kisser or Bowmar nose button. I don't need it but it helps me. The anchor is knuckles on the jawbone for me with a thumb/hinge.
 

TX_hunter

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Nov 6, 2021
Messages
100
If I move to a thumb release do you use a kisser button?

I use a thumb release, no kisser button. I do use a nose button on 2 of my bows and just touch the tip of my nose to the string on my other bow.

I anchor by putting the spot where my pointer and middle finger attach to my hand on the corner of my jawbone, one finger above and one below my jaw. Then touch the tip of my nose to either the nose button or the string.

A lot of the time peep height will need to change when switching from an index finger to a thumb release.
 

bootstrap

Well Known Rokslider
Joined
Dec 4, 2020
Messages
110
I switched to a thumb trigger release several years ago. As several others have said changes are needed for proper peep/sight alignment.

As for anchor, middle knuckle behind the jaw at the bottom of my ear lobe tip of my nose just touching the string.
 
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